Tag Archives: Triangle Home Movie Day

October is Archives Month!

[This blog post was written by Andrea Gabriel, Outreach and Development Coordinator for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

Gov. Pat McCrory's Archives Month Proclamation for October 2015

Gov. Pat McCrory’s Archives Month Proclamation for October 2015

Gov. Pat McCrory has proclaimed October 2015 as Archives Month in North Carolina. The Society of North Carolina Archivists has developed the theme, “Celebrating Archives: North Carolina Arts, Crafts, and Music Traditions” and several archives throughout the state have developed programs and activities to celebrate. View the proclamation.

As in year’s past, the State Archives will host Home Movie Day on October 17 from 1:00—4:00 pm. in the building auditorium at 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh. Bring your own home movies and share with others. Archivists will be on hand to talk about film preservation.

On October 24, 2017, the State Archives and the Friends of the Archives sponsor Treasures of Carolina: Stories from the State Archives,” an exhibit that showcases a selection of the State Archives’ documents, photographs, and maps. Hosted by the Museum of History in Raleigh, the exhibit will remain up through June 19, 2016 and will feature North Carolina’s copy of the Bill of Rights, and the Carolina Charter of 1663 in a brief rotation. For more information about the exhibit visit the ncculture.com description and read our recent blog posts on the upcoming event. We’ll be featuring an artifact each week until the opening. This is an opportunity to view pieces rarely seen. A companion catalog will be available.

And though outside of “Archives Month,” sign up for Ancestry Day on November 7 at the McKimmon Center in Raleigh. This is an event created for seasoned and beginning genealogists alike and 1,000 are expected to attend.

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Home Movie Day Spotlights Families, Communities and Roadtrips!

[This press release comes from Kim Andersen, Audio Visual Materials Archivist in the Special Collections Section of the State Archives of North Carolina.]

Home Movie Day Spotlights Families,
Communities and Roadtrips!

It’s a Social Event…Bring Films, Watch Films and Play Bingo!

Raleigh, NC – Home Movie Day Raleigh will be held on Saturday, October 18, 2014
from 1:00-4:00pm in the auditorium at the State Archives of North Carolina, 109
East Jones Street, Raleigh. The event is free and parking is available around the
Archives. This year’s event is sponsored by the Film Studies Program at NCSU, the
State Archives of North Carolina and A/V Geeks Transfer Services. Participants spend the afternoon watching amateur films and win prizes playing Home Movie Day bingo.

Members of the public are invited to bring in cinematic artifacts of their personal pasts on any film format 8mm, Super8,16mm home movie – as well as VHS or
Video8 format (cued up, 5 minute limit) for inspection, discussion, and onsite
projection. Depending on the condition of the films, attendees will have the chance to view their own films on the big screen. Equipment provided by A/V Geeks
Transfer Services will allow participants to get a free transfer of their film.

Now in its 12th year, Home Movie Day is an international event held in local
communities around the world. It provides an opportunity for attendees to bring in
their home movies, learn more about their own family films, and—most
importantly—watch them and share them with others! Film archivists are on site and
to share information about how to care for films and videotapes so they can be
enjoyed by future generations.

Because they are local events, Home Movie Day screenings can focus on family
and community histories in a meaningful way.

“Home movies can allow us glimpses into the lives of regular people.” says Kim
Andersen of the State Archives of North Carolina. “These little movies provide
insight into that one person or family at a particular point in time and also, when studied with other films shot in and around the same time and locale, can show trends and shed invaluable light on socioeconomic groups and communities. Home movies are compact vignettes of life pithy little snippets chock full of detail and nuance that convey vastly more in much less time and space than a written document or a still image even.”

Charles Story attended the 2013 Home Movie Day event. He remembers, “seeing
the look of pure amazement and joy on people’s faces as they see themselves and
their loved ones, some who have been gone for decades, makes Home Movie Day
a truly unique experience. Hearing participants talk about what they are seeing on
the screen makes a full auditorium feel like a relatives living room, familiar and
comfortable.”

Devin Orgeron is the Director of Film Studies at North Carolina State University, a cosponsor of the Raleigh event. “I’ve been a part of Home Movie Day for years now, and each year tops the previous year in terms of turnout and interesting material.” explains Orgeron. “What impressed me about last year’s event was the sheer number of local film lovers who came out, with or without films to show. I tell my students this every year and I think they are starting to get it now: you can’t really call yourself a film nerd and miss this event.”

For more information about the Raleigh Home Movie Day event on October 18,
please contact Devin Orgeron devin_orgeron@ncsu.edu or visit the Raleigh Home
Movie Day website: http://www.avgeeks.com/hmd.html

For more information about Home Movie Days around the world go to
http://homemovieday.com/.

Home Movie Day 2013 Was the Largest Yet

[This blog post comes from Kim Andersen, Audio Visual Materials Archivist.]

The State Archives hosted a very successful Home Movie Day on October 19, 2013, with over 200 participants and enthusiastic support for doing another Home Movie Day during the first half of 2014 due to overwhelming turn-out at this event.  The October 19th Home Movie Day was the largest Home Movie Day we have ever had in Raleigh, AND it is the biggest one ever held in the country as far as early reporting shows.

At Home Movie Day 2013, a couple view a 1960s wedding scene.

At Home Movie Day 2013, a couple view a 1960s wedding scene.

One of the photos accompanying this blog post shows a couple in the foreground from the back viewing a 1960’s wedding scene.  That couple is watching this footage of their own wedding day for the first time ever!  That’s the kind of thing that makes Home Movie Day so special!

Home Movie Day is a celebration of amateur films and filmmaking held annually at many local venues worldwide.  These events provide the opportunity for individuals and families to see and share their own home movies with an audience of their community, and to see their neighbors’ in turn.  It’s a chance to discover why to care about these films and to learn how best to care for them.  For more information on Home Movie Day, please see http://www.homemovieday.com/ and contact Kim Andersen, Audio Visual Materials Archivist at the State Archives of North Carolina, kim.andersen@ncdcr.gov, (919) 807-7311, with any questions!

Photo shows a large crowd at Home Movie Day 2013, the most successful yet.

Home Movie Day 2013 was the most successful yet.

Reminder: Home Movie Day is Saturday, Oct. 19

Home Movie Day 2013 Poster

Home Movie Day 2013 Poster

Please join us on Saturday, from 1-4 pm at the State Archives of North Carolina for Home Movie Day. For more details, see the original blog post on Home Movie Day.

For driving directions, parking information, or public transit links related to the State Archives and Library building, see the visit us page.

Home Movie Day is a Crash Course in American Culture

[ This press release comes from the Division of Archives and Records. To read about other Division of Archives and Records events, visit our news and events page.]

Home Movie Day is a Crash Course in American Culture.
It’s a Social Event…Bring Films, Watch Films and Play Bingo!

Home Movie Day 2013 Poster

Home Movie Day 2013 Poster. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Raleigh, NC – Home Movie Day Raleigh will be held on Saturday, October 19, 2013 from 1:00-4:00pm in the auditorium at the State Archives of North Carolina, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh. The event is free and free parking is available around the Archives. This year’s event is sponsored by the Film Studies Program at NCSU, the State Archives of North Carolina and A/V Geeks Transfer Services. Participants spend the afternoon watching amateur films and win prizes playing Home Movie Day bingo.

Members of the public are invited to bring in cinematic artifacts of their personal pasts on any film format – 8mm, Super8, 16mm home movie – as well as VHS or Video8 format (cued up, 5 minute limit) for inspection, discussion, and on-site projection. Depending on the condition of the films, attendees will have the chance to view their own films on the big screen. Equipment provided by A/V Geeks Transfer Services will allow participants to get a free transfer of their film.

Now in it’s 11th year, Home Movie Day is an international event held in local communities around the world. It provides an opportunity for attendees to bring in their home movies, learn more about their own family films, and—most importantly—watch them and share them with others! Film archivists are on site and to share information about how to care for films and videotapes so they can be enjoyed by future generations.

Because they are local events, Home Movie Day screenings can focus on family and community histories in a meaningful way.

“We would love to see more films featuring local North Carolina neighborhoods and landscapes,” says Kim Andersen of the State Archives of North Carolina. “One year someone brought footage of Avent Ferry Road in Raleigh, which was just pastures, trees and an occasional farmhouse. Home movies can give us an amazing view of how our environment and our culture has transformed over time.”

Steve B. Wiley’s family films were found in a tin breadbox in the attic. “I had never seen this footage before. The Home Movie Day experts inspected my 40-year-old Super8 film and carefully mounted the reel on the projector. I watched in amazement as my early childhood appeared on the big screen,” shares Wiley. “Home Movie Day is a wonderful event for the whole family,” Wiley continues. “My kids had a great time. It blew their little minds to see daddy as a toddler, and we all had so much fun playing Home Movie Day Bingo!”

Devin Orgeron is the Director of Film Studies at North Carolina State University, a co-sponsor of the Raleigh event. “Home Movie Day is a practical celebration of an aspect of film history that is seldom taught in textbooks or schools,” explains Orgeron. “It’s an opportunity to see how we documented ourselves prior to the digital age. It’s a social event…it’s a crash course in American Culture.” For more information about the Raleigh Home Movie Day event on October 19, please contact Devin Orgeron devin_orgeron@ncsu.edu and 919-802-5026, or visit the Raleigh Home

Movie Day website: http://www.avgeeks.com/hmd.html.

Home Movie Day 2013 Poster

For more information about Home Movie Days around the world go to http://homemovieday.com/.

Armchair Historians – An Archives Week Recap

On Saturday Archives Week kicked off with Triangle Home Movie Day. As always, the event was well attended and a very enthusiastic crowd enjoyed the home movies brought in by their fellow participants. You can sample some of the feel of Home Movie Day celebrations across the world, including our own, by looking at the Twitter hash tag #HMD2012.

Yesterday I gave a talk as part of our celebration of North Carolina Archives Week. The talk, titled “Armchair Historians: Tools You Can Use At Home or On The Go,” covered some of our online resources including our online catalog MARS, the North Carolina Digital Collections, our social media, and some news about new projects and tools on the horizon. If you missed it but would like to read through the slides and presenters notes, a PDF version is available online.

We also had an exhibit in the Search Room yesterday – “Civil War to Civil Rights in North Carolina,” a display of documents and photographs relating to the Archives Week theme, “Journeys to Justice: Civil Rights in North Carolina.” Look for a blog post recap of that event later this week.

It’s not too late to participate in Archives Week because we still have one more event planned: on Thursday, Oct. 25 we will host a workshop on “Digitizing and Remote Sharing of Family Materials.”

Triangle Home Movie Day To Be Held on October 20th

[This post comes from our Non-Textual Materials Archivist, Kim Cumber.]

What hidden treasures lie in those old home movies that you have in the closet? Come to Home Movie Day and find out the value of these unique cultural and historical documents and how to save them for future generations. Spend the day watching old films and playing Home Movie Day bingo. Go home with prizes and a free transfer of your film!

Triangle Home Movie Day is brought to you by A/V Geeks, NCSU Film Studies, Duke’s Archive of Documentary Arts, and State Archives of North Carolina. It will be held Saturday October 20th, 2012 from 1pm – 4pm at the State Archives of North Carolina in downtown Raleigh (109 East Jones Street, First Floor Auditorium). Free and easy parking is available in a lot across the street or via street parking. For more information visit: http://www.avgeeks.com/hmd.html

WHAT IS HOME MOVIE DAY?

Home Movie Day was started in 2002 as a worldwide celebration of amateur home movies, during which people in cities and towns all over would get to meet local film archivists, find out about the long-term benefits of film versus video and digital media, and – most importantly- get to watch those old family films! Because they will happen in communities across the globe, HOME MOVIE DAY events and screenings can focus on local and family histories, taking us back to a time when Main Street was bustling and the beehive hair-do was all the rage, with images of people we may know or resemble. Home movies are an essential record of our past, and they are among the most authoritative documents of times gone by.

This year marks the 10th Home Movie Day with over 70 participating hosts in more than 14 countries.

HOW CAN PEOPLE PARTICIPATE?

It’s simple: rifle through your attics, dig through your closets, call up Grandma, and search out your family’s home movies (8mm, Super8mm, or 16mm) and bring them to the nearest Home Movie Day event to see them projected.  Or just show up and watch the films of others. It’s not just historically significant – it’s fun! Triangle HMD will also be featuring Home Movie Day Bingo with prizes for the WHOLE FAMILY!

SOME TESTIMONIALS FROM PAST HOME MOVIE DAYS

“We brought footage that we had never seen before taken of our wedding in the 1960s.  It was exciting to see us all dressed up in our wedding gear, and that adorable flower girl who is of course all grown up now.”   – Jerrie Dearborn, Raleigh

“You can’t imagine what it means to a parent to look back and see how cute they were and how happy your kids were.  I wouldn’t take a million dollars for these, I really wouldn’t.”  – Gerry Probert, Garner

“Thanks so much for Home Movie Day. It was so great to see my family again the way it was. I called mom last night and told her I had seen the films and she was so happy. It was also the first time my husband had seen my dad ‘in action’.”  – Teresa Nunes, Raleigh

“My family has had a pile of old films in a cabinet for as long as I can remember.  It had been years and years since any of us had thought about them.  After hearing about Home Movie Day, I remembered the films and brought a film that ended up being a short fiction movie my family made in the 1950s starring my mother as a cannibalistic stalker lurking in a tree!  It was enormous fun to see, and it was also wonderful to see some shots of my older sister as a baby, toddling around. I also loved seeing other people’s films.  It was like an unedited archive of what used to be important to record.  It was great!” – Anna Bigelow, Raleigh

“Years of therapy don’t come close to the experience of seeing yourself, at age two, hunting Easter eggs in your plaid overalls.  After the HMD experts had inspected my 40-year-old Super-8 film and carefully mounted the reel on the projector, I watched in amazement as my early childhood appeared on the screen.  I had never seen this footage before; I had never even suspected that such treasures lay waiting in the old tin breadbox of home movies my mother had found in the attic.  My kids had a great time, too.  It blew their little minds to see daddy as a toddler, and they had so much fun playing Home Movie Day Bingo.  Home Movie Day was a wonderful event for the whole family.” – Steve Wiley, Raleigh