Tag Archives: public records

Electronic Records Day – Text Messages as Public Records

This entry is cross-posted from the G.S. 132 Files, the official Records Management blog of the State Archives of North Carolina.

In recognition of Electronic Records Day 2017, sponsored by the Council of State Archivists (CoSA), the State Archives of North Carolina presents the short film “The Texting Club.” This video was created for educational purposes only.

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Highlights from Archives and Records for August

So here we are in the middle of August – which makes it time, I think, to take stock of what’s been going on in Archives and Records.

Our records management staff have been busy posting to the new G.S. 132 Files blog. Although I’m not going to list every excellent post they’ve written this month, I’ll give you some the best and encourage you all to check out the new blog:

Our Civil War 150 blog has been busy as well:

In addition to all of that, the Western Regional Archives opened this month. Our parent organization, the Dept. of Cultural Resources, passed along two interesting videos related to the opening: first, some coverage that the WRA got in the local media; and second, a video of the opening ceremony held on August 10th.

Records Move: Revenue, Secretary of State, and Water and Air Resources

It’s time for the next of our continuing series on the records now available on Saturdays; today’s post includes an assortment of units in the departments of Revenue, Secretary of State, and Water and Air Resources. The complete list of all the materials moved and now available on Saturdays is online as a PDF, but I’m breaking down the list into a series of blog posts.

If you want to read the longer, more complete histories for these departments and divisions, you can do so in our online catalog MARS. It will likely take us a while to change the location codes in MARS and our other finding aids so we ask you to please be patient with us on that score.

Revenue, Dept. of; Tax Research Division, 1929-1934

Prior to the establishment of the Department of Revenue, the administration of North Carolina tax law was dispersed among several state agencies. The state auditor, state Treasurer, secretary of state, commissioner of insurance, State Tax Commission, and clerks of the superior courts each had responsibilities in the listing, assessing, equalization, and collection of various taxes levied by the state.

A constitutional amendment revising the state income tax was enacted in 1919 and passed by popular vote on 2 November 1920. The State Tax Commission was initially charged with administering the new tax, but the enormity of this task added impetus to the effort to create a single agency responsible for North Carolina tax law. In March 1921 the General Assembly established the North Carolina Department of Revenue, headed by a commissioner and assisted by additional clerical staff. The first commissioner of revenue was to be appointed by the governor, with the consent of the state Senate, and serve until 1924. Succeeding commissioners were to be elected every four years.

Major revenue-related responsibilities of the state were grouped under this agency, including the general administration of state tax law, assessments, enforcement, and tax collection. Duties involving the collection of inheritance taxes and franchise and corporation tax assessments were transferred from the State Tax Commission to the department, and the agency became responsible for the administration of the state income tax.

Prior to the establishment of the Department of Revenue, the General Assembly adopted revenue acts each biennium, instructing the various revenue-related agencies of state government to collect appropriate taxes and fees. With the creation of the department in 1921, biennial revenue acts specified in detail the taxes and fees to be levied by that agency. A permanent revenue act was enacted in 1939, and, with amendments, remained in effect until 1989. Kinds of taxes included the inheritance tax, gift tax, license tax, beverage tax, franchise tax, gross earnings tax, intangible property tax, state income tax, sales tax, compensation rise tax, and motor fuels tax.

In 1941 the General Assembly authorized the separation of the statistical and research unit of the Department of Revenue from that agency and its designation as a separate state Department of Tax Research. The governor was granted the right to establish the department, which he did on 1 July 1942. In 1953 the legislature confirmed the independence of the Department of Tax Research as a separate state agency, although it continued to receive funding through and office space from the Department of Revenue. The Advisory Budget Commission was empowered to call upon the Department of Tax Research for amendments and recommendations for changes in the state’s tax laws, which proposals were to be presented to the General Assembly for action. The Executive Organization Acts of 1971 and 1973 transferred the Department of Tax Research back to the Department of Revenue, which assumed all its functions and duties.

Secretary of State, Dept. of; Annual Reports of Licensing Boards, 1956-1977, 1979, 1981

The office of secretary has existed from the time of the earliest organized government in North Carolina. The lords proprietors in 1663 ordered the creation of such an office, its holder to be appointed by themselves. After the crown re-purchased Carolina from the proprietors in 1729, the provincial secretary was appointed directly by the crown. With the coming of statehood, the Constitution of 1776 directed that he be appointed triennially by the General Assembly. A constitutional amendment of 1835 changed the triennial appointment to a biennial one. Under the Constitution of 1868 the office was made popularly elective for a four-year term, a provision that remains in effect under the present state constitution.

The Annual Reports of Licensing Boards file includes annual reports of various licensing boards and correspondence concerning the reports. May also include rosters, registers, or lists of the boards’ licensees, as well as some reports from a few independent regulatory commissions. Grouped by transferred years, then alphabetical by board, then chronological. Some of the boards included are: Alcohol Control, Certified Public Accountant Examiners, Contractors, Dental Examiners, Medical Examiners, Optometry, Pharmacy, Physical Therapists, Plumbing and Heating Contractors, Podiatry Examiners, Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors, Refrigeration Examiners, Well Water Contract Examiners, Library Certification Board, Architecture, Real Estate Licensing Board, etc.

Secretary of State, Dept of; Rules and Regulations of State Agencies, 1942-1979

Reports and information from state agencies related to regulations and rules of agencies, independent regulatory commissions, and occupational licensing boards. In chronological increments of transfer, then alphabetical by agency. This function is now handled by the Office of Administrative Hearings. The rules and regulations dated after 1976 are maintained by that agency. (See RS.No. 3680).

Water and Air Resources, Dept. of, 1944-1959

In 1927 a State Stream Sanitation and Conservation Committee, as an arm of the State Board of Health, was formed to organize and direct the state’s first stream studies. Although composed of the heads and the chief engineers of the State Board of Health and the Department of Conservation and Development, the committee received scant legislative funding for activities during its first two decades. In 1945 the General Assembly formally mandated that the State Stream Sanitation and Conservation Committee would study and report on pollution in all the state’s streams. As a result of the committee’s work, the General Assembly appropriated minimum funds in 1947 for a pollution-control program. That same year Congress enacted the nation’s first Water Pollution Control Act, the basis for present-day state and federal cooperative programs.

In 1951 the General Assembly ratified the State Stream Sanitation Act, creating the renamed State Stream Sanitation Committee as an autonomous body with the State Board of Health and requiring that streams and river basins be classified and pollution control standards adopted. The act also established a set of enforcement provisions, providing a framework and legal basis for the state’s current program of water pollution control.

In 1955 the General Assembly established a Board of Water Commissioners to maintain an inventory of the state’s water resources and to conduct a program of education, planning, and research in long-range water conservation and usage. Additionally, the board was empowered to direct the allocation of water under emergency conditions. Composed of seven gubernatorial appointees, the board was to include at least one member representing each of the following interests: agriculture, municipalities, the electric power industry, and other industries. The director of the Department of Conservation and Development and the executive secretary of the State Stream Sanitation Committee were to serve ex officio on the board’s sixteen-member Advisory Committee.

In 1957 the General Assembly proposed that a state agency study the state’s water resources and advise the governor and legislature as to the laws, policies, and administrative organization needed to coordinate more effectively the state’s ongoing water research activities and utilize its water resources. Under the Department of Water Resources Act of 1959, the General Assembly established an agency to coordinate the state’s activities in order to make improvements in the methods of conserving, developing, and using water resources. The new agency was placed under the direction of a Board of Water Resources consisting of seven members appointed by the governor. Following completion of staggered terms by initial appointees, tenures were for six years. Subject to the governor’s approval, the director of the department was appointed by the board.

Under its enabling legislation, the Department of Water Resources absorbed the previous duties and functions of the Water Resources Division of the Department of Conservation and Development. Additionally, the board was directed to organize the new department into two or more units, including the Navigable Ways Division and the Water Pollution Control Division. The State Stream Sanitation Committee and its programs from the State Board of Health were moved into the latter division.

In 1967 the General Assembly enacted the Water and Air Resources Act, revising the State Stream Sanitation Act of 1951 and replacing the Department of Water Resources with the Department of Water and Air Resources. Authority for this program was to be vested in a Board of Water and Air Resources whose terms of office and power to appoint a director were identical to its predecessor. However, the new board of gubernatorial appointees was enlarged to thirteen members, including eleven members who had served on the former board and the State Stream Sanitation Committee, which was renamed the Pollution Control Committee. Under terms of the act, the board was charged with establishing standards of water and air purity and coordinating policies with other jurisdictions concerned with pollution abatement and control. The board was authorized to organize the department into the following units based on function: water pollution control, air pollution, ground water, and navigable waterways.

Under the Executive Organization Act of 1971 the Department and Board of Water and Air Resources were transferred to the newly formed Department of Natural and Economic Resources, an umbrella agency directed by a cabinet-level secretary appointed by the governor.

Includes: Correspondence; general reports; Hurricane Rehabilitation correspondence; central files: water pollution control – industrial plant sites (proposed), county correspondence, correspondence of the Hydrologic Engineers, water analysis reports, chemical water analysis, salinity data, mineral reports, United States Army Corps of Engineers’ reports, climatological reports and summaries, and surveys of Rivers, Dams, and Creeks; Waterways and Seashore Division subject files; Coastal studies; Director’s Offices files; and other records.

Records Management Gets a New Blog

[This blog post comes from Becky McGee-Lankford of our Government Records Branch.]

It is my pleasure to announce that the official Records Management blog of the State Archives of North Carolina will go live Monday, July 16th. The “G.S. 132 Files: North Carolina Public Records Blog” is our newest form of communicating and interacting with you; the custodians of North Carolina’s public records. It will be available at: http://ncrecords.wordpress.com/. Through this blog, we intend to expand on our records management services by providing you all with an information portal for news, events, training opportunities, and discussion.

Every day, the analysts and archivists at the State Archives of North Carolina answer your questions, consult you for advice, and consider the trickier issues of public records law. Now you will have the opportunity to engage with us collectively. I’m sure I’m preaching to the choir here, but we want to hear from you! As always, please feel free to email or call me with any questions, input, or concerns you have.

Records Move: Natural Resources

In this, the next of our continuing series on the records now available on Saturdays, I’m focusing on records related to natural resources and environmental policy. The complete list of all the materials moved and now available on Saturdays is online as a PDF, but I’m breaking down the list into a series of blog posts.

If you want to read the longer, more complete histories for these departments and divisions, you can do so in our online catalog MARS. It will likely take us a while to change the location codes in MARS and our other finding aids so we ask you to please be patient with us on that score.

Natural and Economic Resources, Dept. of; Coastal Management Office, 1970-1972 and Natural Resources and Community Development, Dept. of; Coastal Management Office, 1972-1978

Includes: Correspondence, drafts of management plans, and records concerning the development of the office’s management plan. Correspondence, memoranda of agreements, public hearing documents, and other related records used to establish interim areas of environmental concern. Correspondence, maps, policies, and other related records concerning fragile natural areas designated as Areas of Environmental Concern by the Coastal Resources Commission. Land use plans submitted by local governments which describe policies for land development in their area. The inventories of land use plans are entered into the office’s Land Use Plans Database.  Drafts and summaries of land use plans, and other related records concerning the development of land use plans.

Approved (and some denied) applications for major permits, plans for coastal development, correspondence, permits, maps or plats, photographs, adjacent riparian landowners’ statements, and other records. Some files may also contain audio cassette tapes of public hearings. For information on dredge and fill permits, see the series: Dredge and Fill File, State Property Office. Some Dredge and Fill permits are included. For the 1978-1980 files, two permits are usually included. One for Dredge and Fill, and one for major development in a protected area. The permits (or some of the information from the permits) are entered and indexed in the agency’s Coastal Area Management Act Tracking System Database.

Natural Resources and Community Development, Dept. of; Division of Environmental Management, 1952-1981

The Environmental Management Commission (EMC) was created as part of the Department of Natural and Economic Resources when that department was re-created and reconstituted under the Executive Organization Act of 1973. The EMC subsequently replaced the board of the former Department of Water and Air Resources and absorbed its major functions of a program of water and air conservation and pollution control. (Originally established in 1959 as the Department of Water Resources, it was renamed the Department of Water and Air Resources in 1967. Prior to its demise in 1973, the department was transferred to the Department of Natural and Economic Resources under the Executive Organization Act of 1971.)

The EMC was formed in the aftermath of the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1970 and the ratification of the federal Water Pollution Control Act amendments of 1972. This act and its amendments substantially extended federal influence by requiring water quality standards, water planning documents, and providing billions of dollars for construction of municipal water treatment facilities. Also, the Governor’s Efficiency Study Commission of 1973 had cited the failure of the Board of Water and Air Resources to be specific in all of its rules and programs and had called for a reorganization of the board and its administrative office to permit a more efficient response to the rapid and significant changes in state and federal laws and regulations.

Under terms of its enabling legislation, the EMC was charged with promulgating rules and regulations designed to protect, preserve, and enhance the water and air resources of the state. Its duties included issuing and revoking permits to control the various sources of pollution; conducting public hearings; instituting court actions; supervising local air pollution control programs; advising local governments regarding floodways; and approving or disapproving applications for dam construction. The board was to be assisted in its duties by the Division of Environmental Management of the Department of Natural and Economic Resources, an administrative arm provided by the Executive Organization Act of 1973.

By executive order of Holshouser in 1975, the Division of Environmental Management was one of several divisions within the Department of Natural and Economic Resources designated for reorganization. It was given broad responsibility for the comprehensive planning and management of the state’s air, surface water, and groundwater resources. Its duties were to include monitoring facility compliance with regulations established by the EMC and enforcing those regulations. Also in 1975, the General Assembly empowered the EMC under certain conditions to waive or modify the requirement that a state permit be obtained to carry on an activity involving a risk of air or water pollution. Circumstances that might warrant such a waiver would include those in which applicants had already complied with federal laws or regulations that were similar to or more restrictive than those of the state. During the same year the EMC absorbed the duties and functions of the Water and Air Quality Control Committee, which had its beginnings in the State Stream Sanitation and Conservation Committee.

In 1977 the General Assembly reorganized the Department of Natural and Economic Resources and renamed it the Department of Natural Resources and Community Development. The EMC and its corresponding division were transferred to and vested in the new department, under the administrative direction of a cabinet-level secretary.

Includes: Air Quality Section Emission – inventory system file and Natural Emissions Data System file;  Director’s Office – enforcement actions file, correspondence, subject file, Environmental Management Commission minutes file, and Water and Air Quality Control Committee minutes; Central Files – monthly monitoring reports, river basin file, and subject files.

Natural Resources, Dept. of; Division of Community Assistance. Special Projects Section, 1975-1985

In 1957 the General Assembly authorized the director of the Department of Conservation and Development to establish a Division of Community Planning, subject to the approval of that agency’s board. The purpose of this division was to assist cities and smaller communities of the state in meeting the problems of urbanization and rapid economic growth. Its primary functions involved conducting various demographic and economic studies and proposing regulations to guide public and private development.

The director of the Department of Conservation and Development was required by state law to assist municipalities, either through the Division of Community Planning, or through contractual arrangements; to receive and expend federal, state, and other funds; and to administer grant contracts from state and federal sources. These duties could be delegated by the departmental director to the director of hurricane rehabilitation who was to serve ex officio as a commissioner of planning.

In 1961 the General Assembly amended Community Planning’s enabling legislation, thus replacing the commissioner of planning with a division administrator. The legislation also specified that services of the division be available to municipalities, counties, and joint and regional planning boards established by two or more governmental units.

In March of 1969 Governor Robert W. Scott requested that the General Assembly establish a Department of Local Affairs for the purpose of assisting local governments in their transitions from rural to urban economies and environments. The governor viewed this new agency as a key element in the state’s efforts to work with local governments and to support them in strategic planning for housing, recreation, land usage, and economic development.

In response, the 1969 General Assembly created the Department of Local Affairs (DLA) as an independent agency and established the Division of Community Planning as one of its major components. Through the DLA’s director, the Division of Community Planning absorbed various duties and functions of its predecessor under the Department of Conservation and Development. The division also had links to the State Planning Task Force which was established in 1965 by Governor Daniel K. Moore and subsequently became a division of the Department of Administration in 1968. Like the Division of Community Planning, the task force was given responsibility for helping municipalities cope with problems created by urbanization and coordinating a variety of related programs under federal, state, local, and private authorities.

In creating the DLA and Division of Community Planning, the legislature stipulated there be an additional advisory body named the Committee on Community Planning. It consisted of the president of the state chapter of the American Institute of Planners, who served ex officio, and nine members appointed by the governor for terms of one year. At least five of these were required to be members, at the time of their appointments, of municipal, county, or joint planning boards.

Under the Executive Organization Act of 1971, the powers and duties of the DLA and its divisions were transferred to the Department of Conservation and Development. By terms of that legislation, the latter agency was assigned for administrative purposes to the newly established umbrella agency, the Department of Natural and Economic Resources. This department was headed by a secretary who was appointed by the governor. In 1971 the Division of Governmental Relations of the DLA merged with the Division of Community Planning to form the Division of Community Services.

Two years later, the Department of Natural and Economic Resources was re-created and reconstituted under the Executive Organization Act of 1973. That legislation essentially repealed the establishment of the DLA and the Department of Conservation and Development. All committees formerly under the DLA, with the exception of Law and Order, were transferred to the reorganized umbrella agency.

The Division of Community Services continued under that same designation until 1974 when it was renamed the Division of Community Assistance.

In 1977 the legislature transferred the Division of Economic Development to the Department of Commerce. In other legislative action that year, the General Assembly reorganized the Department of Natural and Economic Resources and renamed it the Department of Natural Resources and Community Development (NRCD).

During the 1980s the Division of Community Assistance served as one of NRCD’s major community development components, all of which came under an assistant secretary for policy coordination. The division’s duties were to aid local governments in land use planning and to administer the Small Cities Community Development Block Grant program. Funded through the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), that program’s primary purpose was to benefit persons of low and moderate incomes. The block grant funds were used specifically to create or retain jobs, and to make improvements in housing and public facilities in residential areas. Under HUD requirements, the state was required to monitor grantees throughout the life of the funded projects and ensure compliance with federal rules and regulations.

Includes:  Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM), Floodway Maps, Flood Insurance Studies, and some correspondence concerning the maps or studies of approximately 410 flood-prone areas within the state. Most localities will have a dated map set comprised of several sheets and an index sheet. The material was compiled by engineering firms under contract by the United States Federal Emergency Management Agency. The final versions of the maps are more accurate than the preliminary or proof sets of maps, and provide community floodway and floodplain information as a part of the National Flood Insurance Program. Set of these maps were made available to local governments and citizens by the Special Projects Section as a part of the division’s efforts to assist with local planning, management, and research programs.

Housing and Urban Development, 107 Program File – data of HUD-funded Community Development Technical Assistance Program, for which the division provides the technical assistance to recipients of the Community Assistance Block Grant Program.

The State Community Development Grants File includes proposals, historical sketches of the community, correspondence, rules and regulations, amount of requests, acceptance or rejection of submitted grants, and other material concerning state grants to cities and counties.

Records Move: Human Resources

In this, the next of our continuing series on the records now available on Saturdays, I’m focusing on several collections related to the Dept. of Human Resources which have been moved to our new storage space in the Archives and Library building. The complete list of all the materials moved is available as a PDF from our website, but I’m breaking down the list into a series of blog posts.

More information about these collections can be found in our online catalog MARS, but it will likely take us a while to change the location codes in MARS and our other finding aids so we ask you to please be patient with us.

Human Resources, Dept. of,  Division of Facility Services, Certificate of Need Section, 1973-1981

Applications received from medical facilities concerning their need to improve facilities or equipment. The series also contains correspondence between the applicants, the agency, and the U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare. These applications, as required under the Public Health Service Act, are submitted whenever a project exceeds capital expenditure thresholds, a change in bed numbers or a change in category is requested, or when a new institutional health service is proposed. An alphabetical card index to these files is maintained by the agency, which has also been known as the State Health Planning and Development Agency.

Human Resources, Dept. of, N. C. Orthopedic Hospitals, 1900-1981

In 1917 the General Assembly appropriated funds to establish and maintain the North Carolina Orthopedic Hospital. The act stipulated that these initial state funds would be released for its construction and support if matching funds were pledged from other sources. The governor appointed a five-member search committee to select a site and a nine- member board of trustees who would begin serving after the hospital was sited. Three board members served in each category of two, four, and six-year terms of appointment. The board elected its own president, secretary, treasurer, and three-member executive committee. The search committee selected a site in Gastonia in 1919, and the hospital opened to receive its first patients in 1921.

Robert B. Babington, Sr., a Gastonia businessman, believed that North Carolina needed a hospital for crippled, medically indigent children. He began to organize support for the hospital in 1909. Babington then petitioned the assembly in 1911 and each successive seating until he was successful in 1917 in securing state support for the hospital project. The citizens of Gastonia raised the matching funds required to initiate construction, and Babington donated part of the land for the hospital. He also served as the president of the hospital board from 1917 until his death in 1935.

Although the North Carolina Orthopedic Hospital was a state institution, it was authorized to accept gifts and many civic organizations donated time, money, equipment, and services. Two major benefactors, E. T. Latta and Benjamin N. Duke, contributed the funds for a separate unit for black children, which opened in 1926. The hospital conducted a clinic in Goldsboro to serve patients in the eastern part of the state more conveniently and to conserve bed space at the Gastonia facility.

Under the Executive Organization Act of 1971, the North Carolina Orthopedic Hospital was transferred to the Department of Human Resources. The hospital and its board of directors retained their statutory powers and continued to function independently, although the managerial and executive authority was transferred to the secretary of the Department of Human Resources.

Under the Executive Organization Act of 1973, the Council for Institutional Boards was created to facilitate inter-institutional communication and the development of uniform policies in the operation and management of certain state institutions (hospitals, schools for the deaf and the blind, and the Confederate Woman’s Home). The chairmen of six boards of directors, including that of the North Carolina Orthopedic Hospital, constituted the council. The council advised the secretary of the Department of Human Resources, and the council chairman served on the Board of Human Resources. The Board of Directors for the North Carolina Orthopedic Hospital was re-created by this act (still nine members appointed by the governor for six-year terms).

In 1977 the joint House-Senate Base Budget Committee recommended that the North Carolina Orthopedic Hospital be closed. They noted that officials in the Department of Human Resources and members of the fiscal staff of the General Assembly had stated that the physical condition of the hospital was beyond repair. The hospital ceased to operate on 1 July 1979, and the board of directors for the hospital was formally abolished in 1981. The Lenox Baker Children’s Hospital, which had newer facilities, began to provide orthopedic services for those who had been cared for by the Orthopedic Hospital.

Records include: Subject files, Hospital Superintendent’s Statistical Reports, and Board of Directors Minutes files.

Human Resources, Dept. of, Division of Health Services, Epidemiology Section, Tuberculosis Branch, 1907-1980

Minutes of the Board of Directors of the North Carolina Sanatorium System (1923-1972), minutes of the Board of Directors of the North Carolina Specialty Hospitals System (1972-1980), material on hearings before the General Assembly’s Joint Committee on Appropriations (1931), sanitarium system financial reports (1932-1980), and various advisory subcommittee minutes (1966-1978) for Eastern NC, Gravely, McCain, and Western NC hospitals. The McCain Hospital material includes deeds, land plats, photographs, slides and cassette tape, pamphlets, and a “Patient Memory Book” created by Eleanor Syon Stacey (died in 1918). The illustrations are reprinted from the “Dow Collection” (Dow Chemical Co.?) and are of people who suffered from tuberculosis (or other ailments): Andrew Jackson, Jimmie Rodgers, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Frederic Chopin, Christy Mathewson, Robert Lewis Stevenson, and John Henry “Doc” Holliday.

Human Resource, Dept. of Division of Health Services, Epidemiology Section, Occupational Health Branch, 1920’s-1981

Reports, budgets, inspection records, subject files, and other material of long-term value relating to the programs of the branch.

Records Move: Conservation and Development, the CCC, and Confederate Woman’s Home Association

In this, the next of our continuing series on the records now available on Saturdays, I’m focusing on three more collections moved to our new storage space in the Archives and Library building. The complete list of all the materials moved is available as a PDF from our website, but I’m breaking down the list into a series of blog posts.

More information about these collections can be found in our online catalog MARS, but it will likely take us a while to change the location codes in MARS and our other finding aids so we ask you to please be patient with us.

Conservation and Development, 1883-1965

In 1924 Governor Cameron Morrison had given support to legislation for restructuring of the North Carolina Geological and Economic Survey, placing “the duty of a modern Department of Commerce” upon its board. This legislation failed, but Morrison’s successor, Governor Angus W, McLean also supported the restructure and enlargement of the North Carolina Geological and Economic Survey to advertise the states advantages and to promote the proper conservation of the state’s natural resources.

The 1925 General Assembly replaced the survey with the Department of Conservation and Development. The department’s statutory duties included the active promotion and development of the state’s commerce and industry, as well as the protection of its resources. In 1927 the department established a Division of Commerce and Industry to collect and tabulate information relevant to the state’s resources and potential development.

In 1930 the Division of Commerce and Industry merged with the Division of Public Relations this office had previously functioned within the Department of Conservation and Development. The Division of Commerce and Industry continued to promote the state through public relations until 1937, when the department was granted an appropriation that enabled it to create a separate Division of State Advertising.

In 1937 the Division of Commerce and Industry was enlarged to allow it to take a more active approach in recruiting new and diversified industry. Activities of the division during this time included programs to encourage home industries and rural industries, both of which became the foundation of efforts that continued into the next decade and beyond. In 1945 Governor Gregg Cherry appointed a Committee on Rural Industries to support the division’s activities. Composed of one hundred businessmen, the committee held meetings in eleven cities, seeking to stimulate interest in the possibilities of small rural industries that would utilize local labor and raw materials.

In 1953 the U.S. Congress established the Small Business Administration to provide counsel and financial assistance to small businesses throughout the country. In response, the Division of Commerce and Industry converted its home industries program into a Small Industries Section to promote the growth of locally owned and operated industries and the creation of new enterprises. In 1962 the Division of Commerce and Industry added a Food Processing Section to encourage the development of modern processing operations.
During the late 1950s and early 1960s, the Division of Travel Information (previously named the Division of State Advertising) worked in cooperation with the Division of Commerce and Industry, conducting “Get acquainted with North Carolina” events for newcomers to the state. The two divisions also worked on a project locating welcome centers at interstate highway exits near the state’s borders. The Division of Commerce and Industry subsequently established a Travel and Tourism Section that continued into the next decade.

During the mid-1960s, the Small Industries Section merged with the newly formed Community and Industrial Services Section. The section subsequently became the main arm of the Division of Commerce and Industry for the collection of community data to be stored in a computerized data bank for use by the division and various local development groups throughout the state. Another major function of the section involved determining the expansion requirements of various manufacturers within the state and their needs for materials, suppliers, and markets.

Under the Executive Organization Act of 1971, the Department of Conservation and Development was placed under the newly formed Department of Natural and Economic Resources, headed by a cabinet- level secretary appointed by the governor. The old Department of Conservation and Development and its board retained their previous statutory powers. During the initial phase of reorganization there was little structural change. However, the division was placed under an Office of Industrial, Tourist, and Community Resources, an administrative arm of the new department. During 1973 the Governor’s Efficiency Study Commission recommended that the office be restructured to include only the Division of Commerce and Industry and a Division of Science and Technology. According to the commission, the Board of Science and Technology should be altered to emphasize the commercial and industrial value of research and to aid the state’s economic growth.
Subsequently, the Department of Natural and Economic Resources was re-created and reorganized under the Executive Organization Act of 1973 and charged with promoting the state’s economic development. The functions and powers previously vested in the Department of Conservation and Development and its board  were formally assigned to the new department, and the Department of Conservation and Development and its board ceased to exist.

Records include: Economic and Geological survey correspondence and subject file; board minutes and reports; Biennial reports; administrative reports and correspondence; activities of the department; miscellaneous subject files; assistant director administrative files; Division of Commerce and Industry; Advertising Division; Division of Mineral Resources; Fisheries Commissions Board; North Carolina Film Board files; and other materials.

Note: The Conservation and Development, Travel and Tourism Division photograph files are part of the Non-Textual Materials collection. Some of those materials are currently available online as part of the North Carolina Digital Collections.

Civilian Conservation Corps: Enrollment and Discharge Records, n.d.

The objectives of the Civilian Conservation Corps were two-fold; utilization of the country’s human resources and conservation of the country’s physical resources. These objectives were realized by employing thousands of young men between the ages of 18 and 25 in jobs that were a benefit to conservation, restoration and protection of forests, control of soil erosion and flood control, development of public parks, recreational and historic areas, wild life conservation and other useful public works. The Department of War was responsible for physical examination, enrollment, equipping and conditioning of the men. The Departments of Agriculture and the Interior were responsible for the selection and planning of work projects on national forests, parks, monuments, soil erosion control and the supervision of all projects on state and private lands and state parks. The North Carolina Emergency Relief oversaw local selecting agencies throughout the state to execute the details necessary to placing the men in camps. Of the total 66 camps, 28 were assigned to forest protection and preservation, 22 to soil erosion control, 9 to park projects, 3 to military reservations, 1 to wild life conservation and 3 to Tennessee Valley Authority projects.

Records include: Enrollment and discharge records, arranged in alphabetical order by county.

For more information about the Civilian Conservation Corps, visit our Work Projects in North Carolina exhibit.

Confederate Woman’s Home Association, Dept. of Human Resources, 1862, 1896-1976, n.d.

In 1913 the General Assembly incorporated the Confederate Woman’s Home Association to establish, maintain, and govern a home for needy and dependent wives and widows of NC Confederate soldiers and other “worthy dependent women of the Confederacy”. The association was also to assist indigent Confederate women in their own homes throughout the state. The association was governed by a seven-member board of directors appointed by the governor for two-year terms, who then elected their own president and secretary. The state treasurer served as ex officio treasurer of the association, and it was to be incorporated for forty years. The board established rules and regulations for the maintenance and operation of the home, and for the collection and disbursement of funds for needy Confederate women living elsewhere in the state.

An advisory board of ten “lady managers” was also created to assist the board of directors in the management and furnishing of the home, and in the solicitation of donations to the association. The lady managers were appointed by the board of directors for two-year terms. Vacancies on this advisory board, including the expiration of terms, were to be filled by women who represented each congressional district in the state.

In 1949 the General Assembly extended the corporation’s existence to 1 January 1960. It also added the category of deserving daughters of NC Confederate soldiers to the statute’s criteria of admission to the home, providing that no daughters should be admitted after 1 January 1953. In 1953 this proviso was repealed. Amendments in 1959 and 1969 each added an additional ten-year term of existence to the association.

The Executive Organization Act of 1971 permitted the board and the association to retain full statutory powers, but placed the Confederate Woman’s Home Association under the newly-created Department of Human Resources for administrative purposes. The Executive Organization Act of 1973 re-created the Department of Human Resources and restated the composition of the board for the association (seven members appointed by the governor for two-year terms) and its duties, which had remained generally consistent over sixty years.

In 1981 both the secretary of Human Resources and the board of directors for the home recommended that the General Assembly close the Confederate Woman’s Home, out of concern for the safety of the few remaining residents and the expense of maintaining a dilapidated structure. The General Assembly dissolved the Confederate Woman’s Home Association and closed the home effective 1 July 1981. The state assumed responsibility for relocating the remaining residents in nursing or rest homes and for bearing the non-federally funded share of the cost of their care. Title to the stocks held by the association were transferred back to the North Carolina Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. The board, prior to its abolition, was authorized to dispose of the personal property, furnishings, and paintings in the home.

Records include: superintendent’s correspondence, financial records, menus, subject files, and memorabilia.