Tag Archives: press releases

Friends of the Archives Hosts “North Carolina and WWI” Event June 19

[This blog post comes from a Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources press release. You can find other press releases on http://www.ncdcr.gov.]

Logo for North Carolina and World War IRaleigh, N.C. – One hundred years ago, America entered the Great War and thousands of North Carolinians answered the call to serve their country at home and overseas.

To commemorate the centennial of the war, the Friends of the Archives will sponsor “North Carolina and World War I,” presented by Jackson Marshall, historian and deputy director of the North Carolina Museum of History. The free, public program will be held in the State Archives/Library Building, 109 E. Jones St., Raleigh, June 19 at 1 p.m.

After his talk, Marshall will lead a tour of the World War I exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of History located across Jones St. from the Archives Building. The 6,500-square-foot exhibition highlights artifacts, period photography, a trench diorama, historical film footage, educational interactive components, and video re-enactments that feature European and North Carolina soldiers and citizens to relate the stories of ordinary men and women from North Carolina who provided extraordinary service to their country 100 years ago.

Marshall is a native North Carolinian and the grandson of a World War I soldier. He received B.A. and M.A. degrees from Wake Forest University and is the author of “Memories of World War I.”

About the Friends of the Archives
The Friends of the Archives is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization formed in 1977 to privately fund some of the services, activities and programs of the State Archives of North Carolina not provided by state-appropriated funding.  The mission of the State Archives is to collect, preserve and provide access to North Carolina’s documentary history and culture.

About the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. NCDNCR’s mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state’s history, conserving the state’s natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development.

NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette’s Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C. Zoo, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Division of Land and Water Stewardship. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.

State Capitol to Host Presidential Signature from the State Archives of NC

[This blog post comes from a Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources press release – you can find other press releases on http://www.ncdcr.gov.]

Thomas Jefferson, Monticello, January 22, 1816, to Nathaniel Macon

Thomas Jefferson, Monticello, January 22, 1816, to Nathaniel Macon [VC.12]. See this item in the NC Digital Collections: http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p15012coll11/id/172

RALEIGH, N.C. – Visitors to the State Capitol this summer will have a chance to view a signature of Thomas Jefferson! From Thursday, June 22nd through Tuesday, July 11th, the Capitol will host a document that showcases the signature of Jefferson, third president of the United States, Founding Father, and author of the Declaration of Independence.

The document is a letter that Jefferson wrote to Nathanial Macon, a U. S. Senator from North Carolina, in 1816. The two were discussing the creation of a statue to honor George Washington for display in the first NC State House to stand on Capitol Square. Jefferson, writing in response to Macon’s request for sculptor suggestions, states that only Italian sculptor Antonio Canova should create such a statue. North Carolina commissioned the statue from Canova per Jefferson’s recommendation. The original statue was installed in the first State House in 1821. Unfortunately, it was destroyed when the State House burned down in 1831, but a copy now stands in the Capitol’s rotunda. You can view the statue’s copy, as well as pieces of the original Canova statue on display as part of the Capitol’s new exhibit “George Washington is Here: Images of the Founding Father in the North Carolina State Capitol.” The Jefferson document, on loan from the State Archives of NC, is part of the Archives’ vault collection and not often available for public viewing. Join the Capitol for a look at this treasure of the State Archives of NC!

Please call (919) 733-4994 for more information.

The State Capitol’s mission is to preserve and interpret the history, architecture and function of the 1840 building and Union Square. It is within the Division of State Historic Sites within the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, and located at One Edenton Street, Raleigh. For additional information please call, or visit www.nchistoricsites.org/capitol.

The State Archives of North Carolina’s mission is to collect, preserve, and make available for public use historical and evidential materials relating to North Carolina. Its holdings consist of official records of state, county and local governmental units, copies of federal and foreign government materials, and private collections. For additional information please call, or visit http://archives.ncdcr.gov/.

About the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susi Hamilton, NCDNCR’s mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state’s history, conserving the state’s natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development.

NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette’s Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C.  Zoo, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Division of Land and Water Stewardship. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.

 

North Carolina World War I Military Data Now Searchable Online

[This blog post comes from a Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources press release – you can find other press releases on www.ncdcr.gov.]

World War I service card for James Alston of Wake Forest, N.C.

World War I service card for James Alston of Wake Forest, N.C.

RALEIGH, N.C. – Nearly 100 years ago, thousands of North Carolina men shipped out to Europe to serve in the Great War. Who were they? Where did they come from and how did they serve? Who were the men and women who served at home and overseas?

A searchable database of North Carolina’s World War I service cards, compiled after the war, is now available online at Family Search (familysearch.org) and can help answer those questions.

Using data from cards maintained at the State Archives of North Carolina, the database, searchable by name, includes place and date of induction, residence, and place and date of birth for officers, enlisted men, nurses, medics and chaplains who served in an official military capacity during World War I. Branches of service include the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. The actual service card is viewable through the database and contains additional information such as rank, unit, overseas service date and date of discharge from active military service.

“These service cards serve as a fundamental resource for those wishing detail about 80,000 North Carolinians who served their country during World War I,” said Matthew Peek, Military Collection archivist at the State Archives. “The searchable database created by Family Search makes our records freely accessible to everyone as we head into the 100th commemoration of American’s entry into World War I.”

The project is part of North Carolina’s official commemoration of the centennial of America’s entrance into World War I.

“The State Archives preserves many World War I archival records and we are pleased to partner with Family Search to make this military information easily accessible,” said State Archivist Sarah Koonts. “As the 100th anniversary of America’s involvement in the war approaches, we’ll be working with other divisions within the department to create programs that honor those men and women who served our country.”

World War I created the modern world by undermining European aristocracy, shifting national borders, industrializing warfare and expanding the public realm of women, among other effects. North Carolina emerged from this first global conflict less rural, more worldly, and better equipped to serve the nation through industry, military installations and shipbuilding enterprises at our ports.

The North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources’ World War Centennial Committee will oversee the state’s official Commemoration of World War I. For more information and to learn more about commemorative activities, please visit our website at www.ncdcr.gov/worldwar1. To learn more about the collection, please visit FamilySearch’s Wiki page at http://bit.ly/2emn8ZK. Search the database itself at https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2568864 and then take a look at the original service cards created by the North Carolina Adjutant General.

About the State Archives of North Carolina

The State Archives of North Carolina State Archives collects, preserves, and makes available for public use historical and evidential materials relating to North Carolina. Its holdings consist of official records of state, county and local governmental units, copies of federal and foreign government materials, and private collections.

About the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan Kluttz, NCDNCR’s mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state’s history, conserving the state’s natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development.

NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette’s Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C. Zoo, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Division of Land and Water Stewardship. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.

State Archives Digitizes Records of World War I Combat and Civilian Experiences

[This blog post comes from a Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources press release – you can find other press releases on www.ncdcr.gov.]

Rowan County Red Cross Nurses, 1918

Rowan County Red Cross Nurses, 1918. See this item in the North Carolina Digital Collections.

Raleigh, N.C. – Letters recounting the full military experience of North Carolina Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force service members, one-of-a-kind American Red Cross chapter unit histories and a three volume history of the North Carolina Council of Defense – which managed rationing and War Savings Stamps – are among the many World War I era documents being digitized by the State Archives of North Carolina.

The initiative of the Military Collection of the State Archives will digitize original World War I historic materials documenting North Carolinians’ role in the war at home and abroad. This project is part of North Carolina’s commemoration of the centennial of America’s entrance into World War I. The materials were collected during and after the war and are housed in the WWI Papers at the State Archives.

Unique materials touching on all parts of the state’s involvement in the war effort between 1917 and 1919 will be digitized. The Red Cross records name women who served the effort in the state’s towns and counties. Reports from the horrific Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 and other hardships will be recounted.

Pocket diaries and journals with dated entries from North Carolina service members that document experiences from basic training, movement in Europe and the return home will be digitized, as will draft registration posters from 1917 and other home front posters. Digitization of the previously unpublished history of the North Carolina Council of Defense, compiled by famed state geologist and WWI veteran Joseph Hyde Pratt, will make available all aspects of North Carolina’s involvement and response to the war effort.

“It is vital for the State Archives to expand the user base for materials we have held for the public’s use since World War I,” says Military Collection Archivist Matthew Peek. “Many of these have seen little use for scholarly research, and few people were aware of their existence. We hope this project will help North Carolinians gain a broader understanding of the cultural, social and economic impact of World War I on the state.”

The WWI digitization effort will continue through 2018 as part of public programming by the State Archives to bring original WWI materials to a wider audience in support of public research and to provide resources for schools.

The newly-digitized materials are online in the North Carolina Digital Collections website, under World War I collection, at http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/home/collections/wwi. New materials will be continually added.

For additional information please call project director Matthew Peek at (919) 807-7314. The Military Collection is part of the State Archives within the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

 

About the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan Kluttz, NCDNCR’s mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to

experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state’s history, conserving the state’s natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development.

NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette’s Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C. Zoo, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Division of Land and Water Stewardship. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.

Stamp Act Rebellion Documents from 1760s on Exhibit Feb. 18 at the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

[This blog post comes from the Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources – you can find other news related to NC Natural and Cultural Resources here.]

Small image with a skull and crossbones and the words This is the Place to affix the STAMPA precursor to the Revolutionary War, the Stamp Act Rebellion of 1765 at Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson resulted from anger and resentment directed toward the British Crown. Unfair taxes and regulation led to the Stamp Act Resistance, the first successful armed rebellion against British authority in America.

Original, rare documents from the period will be exhibited Feb. 18, by the State Archives at the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources before they go on loan to Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson State Historic Site for the 250th Anniversary of Stamp Act Resistance in North Carolina on February 20.

Documents exhibited include articles from the “North Carolina Gazette” of 1765, articles from the “London Chronicle” of 1766, and a document signed by all North Carolina signers of the Declaration of Independence. The exhibit will be open February 18 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. in the auditorium of the DNCR building at 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh.

The document exhibition and event at Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson are part of the DNCR’s It’s Revolutionary! commemoration of early North Carolina history.

“Extra! Extra! Learn all about It” Workshop at the Western Office to Feature Online Newspapers

[This blog post comes from a Dept. of Cultural Resources press release – you can find other news related to NC Cultural Resources here.]

Western Carolinian issue Nov. 6, 1821ASHEVILLE, N.C – Did you ever wonder what was going on in the headlines on the day you were born? Do you want to uncover history from primary resources? Would you like to learn about newspaper collections available online and how to use and use them? The Western Regional Archives is offering a special workshop Extra! Extra! Learn All About It! that will explore some useful databases for accessing online newspapers. The hour-long program on Tuesday, February 16th from 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. is suitable for researchers, teachers, students, genealogists and those interested in gaining an insight into where to start when researching and is free and open to the public. Participants are asked to bring suggested topics of interest that will be investigated during the workshop.

Extra! Extra! Learn All About It! will be conducted by archivist, Sarah Downing of the Western Regional Archives. A certified North Carolina librarian, Downing has been with the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources for over 20 years, and joined the staff at the Western Office a year ago. She enjoys helping patrons fulfill their research requests and conducting historical research with old newspapers. Sarah honed her skills while writing several books for The History Press and wanted to share what she has learned.

The Western Office of the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources is located at 176 Riceville Road, Asheville, N.C.  For additional information, please call (828) 296-7230, email sarah.downing@ncdcr.gov, or visit http://www.ncdcr.gov/westernoffice.

 

About the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources 

The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan Kluttz, NCDNCR’s mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state’s history, conserving the state’s natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development.

NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette’s Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C.  Zoo, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, the State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Clean Water Management Trust Fund and the Natural Heritage Program. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.

State Archives Needs Your Help to Preserve North Carolina’s Military Heritage

[This press release comes from Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

Cover of The Wildcat, published in France by the Eighty-First Division, May 10, 1919

Cover of The Wildcat, published in France by the Eighty-First Division, May 10, 1919.

Do you or your family wonder what to do with original historic materials from veterans’ military service? Are you looking for ways to preserve the legacy of North Carolina veterans? Are you a North Carolina veteran who has original materials from your military service, and might be interested in having them preserved?

The Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina works to document and preserve records detailing North Carolina’s rich military history from colonial days to the present.

The Military Collection collects, arranges, describes, preserves, and makes accessible to the public historical materials that document the history and development of North Carolina’s military history for conflicts involving its citizens, residents, and enlisted military personnel in North Carolina. The State Archives’ Military Collection provides a professionally-curated research collection of military history that supports public and educational programming; scholarly and student research; and the public interest in relation to the mission of the State Archives of North Carolina.

“As we have come to the centennial of World War I, the 75th anniversary of World War II, and the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War, we would like to remind the public that the State Archives cares greatly about our servicemen and servicewomen’s sacrifices and dedication to their country, comrades, and families,” says Matthew Peek, military collection archivist at the State Archives.

“We offer veterans and their families a location to preserve the materials of veterans’ military service, that is freely accessible to the public and work to utilize our Military Collection to educate the public about military service and culture,” he concludes.

Military records or materials extend beyond combat or training to include items that were created during wartime and document reactions to the conflict. Letters written between a service member and their family or friends, documents detailing a non-combatant veteran’s daily work, training manuals, maps and architectural drawings, photographs, films, print-outs of social media posts from a service individual—these all constitute military materials to be preserved.

If you or your family may be interested in donating your historic military materials, you can call the Military Collection Archivist at 919-807-7314, or email him at matthew.peek@ncdcr.gov.

You can also visit the Military Collection’s webpage to learn more about the collection and how to donate your military materials: http://archives.ncdcr.gov/Public/Collections/Non-Government/Military-Collections.