Tag Archives: Outer Banks History Center

Explore the Outer Banks Hispanic Community with the Mano al Hermano Records

[This blog post was written by Samantha Crisp, Director of the Outer Banks History Center.]

In recognition and celebration of the contributions and culture of Hispanic and Latinx Americans to our nation and society, Gov. Roy Cooper has proclaimed September 15, 2018 to October 15, 2018 as Hispanic Heritage Month for the state of North Carolina. In conjunction with Governor Cooper’s announcement, we would like to share one of our recently processed collections that directly relates to North Carolina’s Latinx community, the Mano al Hermano Records.

Clipping from the Outer Banks Sentinel, 23 March 2011, announcing grant funding for Mano al Hermano. From ORG.5284 Mano al Hermano Records, Outer Banks History Center.

Mano al Hermano (“My Hand to My Brother”) was envisioned as early as 2003, when
a Latinx support group for the Outer Banks community was founded by Sister Arcadia Rivera. After dying out, this group was revived by Ginger Candelora in 2010 as an affiliate with Interfaith Community Outreach. Candelora’s group was given 501(c)(3) status in April 2011 under a new name, Mano al Hermano.

Mano al Hermano’s mission is to serve the Hispanic and Latinx community of the Outer Banks by supporting literacy and education initiatives, offering English language classes, providing guidance on immigration and other legal issues, and encouraging collaboration between the Latinx and Anglo communities of Dare County. From 2013 to 2017, Mano al Hermano organized an annual celebration in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, first called the Hispanic Heritage Festival, and later called the OBX Latin Festival. The organization offers regular workshops and presentations on developing issues affecting the Latin American community as a whole and the Latinx community of the Outer Banks specifically, including changes in federal immigration policies (for example, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA), local resolutions relating to undocumented immigrants, and guidance on dealing with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials.

Program for OBX Hispanic Heritage Festival, 2014. From ORG.5284 Mano al Hermano Records, Outer Banks History Center.

One of Mano al Hermano’s early initiatives was to establish a community garden on Roanoke Island with the assistance of the Dare County Airport Authority. The goal of the community garden was “to provide affordable and accessible healthy food to locals while encouraging community involvement and interaction.” Mano al Hermano still operates this community garden today, with a special plot set aside for children affiliated with the organization to participate in a 4-H club called the “Mini Dirt Diggers.”

Another major initiative led by the group is the Family Literacy Program. This program involves home-based volunteer tutoring for elementary school children on a weekly basis as well as English language lessons for parents. The project is supported by community volunteers who act as tutors. The program also includes a special eight-week summer program culminating in and a field trip for participants hosted by the North Carolina Coastal Federation.

ORG.5284 MAH DACA Flyer

Flyer for DACA workshop, 2017. From ORG.5284 Mano al Hermano Records, Outer Banks History Center.

The Outer Banks History Center’s Mano al Hermano Records, 2010-2018, contains newspaper clippings, event flyers and programs, photographs, a scrapbook, and other papers created and collected by the organization from the time of its inception. Photographs in the collection mainly depict groups of children participating in various activities as part of Mano al Hermano’s Family Literacy Program and working in the community garden. For more details about the collection, researchers can view its finding aid, which is accessible in both English and Spanish.

Unfortunately, significant documentation of the Hispanic/Latinx community is lacking in many archives, including the State Archives of North Carolina and its regional units. Collections like the Mano al Hermano Records are indispensable to researchers attempting to understand the experiences, contributions, and stories of Hispanic North Carolinians. If you have original materials documenting the Hispanic community in North Carolina, are affiliated with a Latinx advocacy group, or would be willing to record an oral history interview about your role in the Latinx community, please reach out to us today to discuss donating your materials to our repository. We must act now to ensure that this important history is not lost!

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A Major Move in Manteo

[This blog post comes from Donna Kelly, Head of the Special Collections Section.]

Donna working with maps at the OBHC

Donna Kelly inventorying maps at the OBHC

During February 19–23, Bill Brown (State Archives registrar) and Donna Kelly (head of Special Collections) traveled to the Outer Banks History Center (OBHC) to help Samantha Crisp (director of the OBHC) and her staff renumber, relabel, and shift records. This effort was part of a larger one to standardize the numbering of archival records within the Special Collections regional facilities. In addition, collections were shifted to provide easier access and provide uniformity to records storage at the OBHC.

On the first two days Donna renumbered 162 maps, incorporating a new call number system used at the main office of the State Archives in Raleigh. For the last three days she inventoried and reorganized 20 of 40 map drawers, which included approximately 874 maps. Folders within each map drawer were labeled A to Z.

Over the course of five days, Bill shifted and recorded shelf locations for 154 renumbered collections (including the Manteo Coastland Times bound newspapers). He moved 657 cubic feet of material from the back of the stacks to the front for better access. (A cubic foot is approximately the size of a box of copier paper.) He also cleaned five rows of shelving with ethanol.

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Samantha shifted approximately 735 cubic feet of materials, including photographic collections, periodicals, and unprocessed records. She also assigned new call numbers to 150 collections and relabeled 200 boxes.

Stuart Parks relocated all of the framed artwork and renumbered digital files of scanned items. He also helped move shelving and cut folders that were used to rehouse many of the maps. Tama Creef covered the front office.

All in all it was a productive, albeit exhausting, week!

Apply for the Outer Banks History Center’s David Stick Internship!

The Outer Banks History Center (OBHC) is excited to announce the establishment of a paid internship for the 2018 summer season. The David Stick Internship, sponsored by the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center, is a 10-week, full time position performing archival work for the OBHC. The intern will be paid a $4,000 stipend. Additionally, local housing can be arranged for the intern at a reasonable cost. More information about the position, including eligibility and application instructions, can be found below. Questions about the position, the application process, or the OBHC can be made to Samantha Crisp, OBHC Director, at samantha.crisp@ncdcr.gov or 252-473-2655.

The David Stick Intern will assist the archivists of the OBHC in completing a variety of projects. Duties may include:

  • Assisting patrons and providing reference assistance in the OBHC reading room
  • Arranging and describing archival collections
  • Assisting with intake and establishing initial intellectual control of new archival accessions
  • Identifying, numbering, and sleeving historical photographs
  • Cataloging books and published items
  • Transcribing and indexing oral histories
  • Scanning and providing metadata for historical documents and photographs
  • Planning and fabricating exhibits with OBHC materials
  • Contributing to OBHC outreach efforts (such as social media or public programming)
  • Designing promotional materials
  • Assisting OBHC staff members on individual projects

Required Qualifications: This position requires attention to detail, curiosity, creativity, and excellent writing skills. Applicants should demonstrate an ability to communicate effectively with members of the public, and prior customer service experience is required. The ideal applicant will excel at working both independently and as part of a team. Prior coursework (at the graduate or undergraduate level) in history, archives, library science, or a related field, or a demonstrated interest in history is required.

Preferred Qualifications: Prior experience working in an archival repository, library, museum, or other cultural heritage setting. Prior coursework in archives and records management, library science, public history, or a related subject. Knowledge of current library and archival standards and best practices (especially DACS).  Experience working with one or more archival content management systems (Archivist’s Toolkit, ArchivesSpace, Archon, AXAEM, etc.). Experience arranging, describing, and encoding finding aids for archival collections. Knowledge of North Carolina’s coastal history and/or the Outer Banks region.

Eligibility: The application is open to current graduate students, recent graduates who will have received their master’s or bachelor’s degree no earlier than December 2017, undergraduate students who will have completed their sophomore year prior to beginning work, and community college students who will have completed at least one year of coursework prior to beginning work.

About the OBHC: The Outer Banks History Center (OBHC) is a regional archival facility administered by the State Archives of North Carolina. The mission of the OBHC is to collect, preserve, and provide public access to historical and documentary materials relating to coastal North Carolina, and to serve as an accessible, service-oriented center for historical research and inquiry. For more information, visit the OBHC website at https://archives.ncdcr.gov/researchers/outer-banks-history-center.

How to ApplyComplete the online application for the David Stick Internship here. The application closes Sunday, February 25th.

Champney Sketches Added to NC Digital Collections

We are constantly adding new materials to the North Carolina Digital Collections, but one recent addition of note includes the Civil War sketches of soldier and artist, Edwin G. Champney, from the Outer Banks History Center.

OBHC_33GRF_104_10

Juniper Bay, Hyde County, N.C. Civil War sketches by Edwin G. Champney, Civil War Collection, NC Digital Collections

This collection includes sixty unpublished pen-and-ink sketchbook drawings of coastal North Carolina between 1862-1863 illustrated by soldier and artist, Edwin G. Champney (1843-1899). Champney was a native Bostonian and Union soldier. Champney enlisted as a private in the 5th Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, Company G at the time he sketched the drawings. He arrived in Eastern North Carolina in October 1862 and took part in the Goldsboro Expedition. Champney was stationed at Cape Hatteras from February 23, 1863 until the close of his North Carolina tour on June 22, 1863. The original artwork include scenes showing landmarks, landscapes, and Union military activity from or in the vicinity of Hatteras Island, New Bern, Kinston, Plymouth, and Hyde County. The sketchbook was donated to the Outer Banks History Center in Manteo, which is the permanent home for the drawings.

These materials are now part of the Civil War Collection in the North Carolina Digital Collections.

The Scary Truth Series, Pt. III

This is the third of three entries in a special Halloween-inspired blog series highlighting a collection of ghost stories, legends, folklore, and facts from North Carolina. Like sweet tea and college basketball, folklore is a major part of North Carolina’s cultural heritage. Legends and stories passed down from generations keep the state’s history alive and ultimately help us remember life as it once was. 

The Scary Truth Series, Pt. I
The Scary Truth Series, Pt. II

The Ghost Ship: Carroll A. Deering

Another quintessential characteristic of North Carolina culture is its rich maritime history, from shipwrecks as common as today’s car accidents and epic pirate tales that are almost beyond belief. Over 5,000 historic shipwrecks have been documented along the North Carolina coast, giving it the appropriate nickname, the “Graveyard of the Atlantic.” This leads us to one of the most legendary maritime mysteries in the state’s history: the wreck of the Carroll A. Deering, otherwise known as the “Ghost Ship” of the Outer Banks.

Deering-NPS

Carroll A. Deering, built in 1919 in Bath, Maine – National Park Service Collection, courtesy of the Outer Banks History Center.

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Family Traditions of Service: Women’s Air Corps servicewomen marching in a military parade in Paris, circa 1942-1945

[This blog post was written by Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

America’s involvement in World War II saw enlistments in unprecedented numbers in various branches of the U.S. Armed Services. There were new opportunities for women, as it became apparent that the military could free up more men to fight worldwide. Over 400,000 women enlisted to serve in America, Europe, and Asia as ambulance drivers, pilots, aircraft mechanics, nurses, and other non-traditional roles. More than 400 women lost their lives, while 88 were captured and held as prisoners of war.

This photograph comes from the World War II service of Mary “Brockie” Daniles of Manteo, N.C. Mary Brockwell “Brockie” Daniewomen_air_corp_paris_wwiils (1912-2007) was born in Manteo, North Carolina to Edward and Mary Wescott Daniels. She was n the Women’s Air Corps in both the United states and Europe during World War II. During the war, she was sent to Paris, France, as a member of the 29th Traffic Regulating Group. This group was responsible for controlling and regulating traffic in the Military Railway Service, in Marine Operations, and Motor Transport throughout the European Theatre for the Allied forces. After the war, Daniels remained in the one of five children. Daniels received her BA in English in 1935 from the Women’s College of the University of North Carolina. From 1936-1939, Daniels taught English and history in Hertford County, North Carolina. She also served as recreational director for a reform school in Hertford County and was the Hertford County supervisor of adult education. Shortly afterwards, Daniels enlisted in the U.S. Air Force, serving iAir Force until her retirement in 1964.

The photograph was taken or collected by Brockie Daniels while she was stationed in Paris. Daniels took photographs of women and men marching or walking through the streets of Paris, coordinating traffic flow and transportation, and sightseeing with her comrades in France.

Credit line: Women’s Air Corps Camp, France, World War II Folder, Brockie Daniels Papers, Outer Banks History Center

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This blog post is one in two-week series of posts sharing the items used in the exhibit titled “The Family Traditions of Service:  A Historical Tribute to Veterans.” This exhibit, on display from November 3 to November 13, 2015, at the Dare County Arts Council building in Manteo, N.C., is sponsored by the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center, the exhibit serves as a historical tribute to over 100 years of military service of North Carolina residents and their families, with particular emphasis on coastal North Carolina. The goal of the exhibit is to honor the role of North Carolina veterans and their families during peacetime and war. The items from this exhibit come from the holdings of the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina and the Outer Banks History Center.

Family Traditions of Service: Mary Brockwell “Brockie” Daniels surrounded by her WAC colleagues, circa 1942-1945

[This blog post was written by Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

America’s involvement in World War II saw enlistments in unprecedented numbers in various branches of the U.S. Armed Services. There were new opportunities for women, as it became apparent that the military could free up more men to fight worldwide. Over 400,000 women enlisted to serve in America, Europe, and Asia as ambulance drivers, pilots, aircraft mechanics, nurses, and other non-traditional roles. More than 400 women lost their lives, while 88 were captured and held as prisoners of war.

danielssurroundedbysoldiers_wwiiThis photograph comes from the World War II service of Mary “Brockie” Daniles of Manteo, N.C. Mary Brockwell “Brockie” Daniels (1912-2007) was born in Manteo, North Carolina to Edward and Mary Wescott Daniels. She was one of five children. Daniels received her BA in English in 1935 from the Women’s College of the University of North Carolina. From 1936-1939, Daniels taught English and history in Hertford County, North Carolina. She also served as recreational director for a reform school in Hertford County and was the Hertford County supervisor of adult education. Shortly afterwards, Daniels enlisted in the U.S. Air Force, serving in the Women’s Air Corps in both the United states and Europe during World War II. During the war, she was sent to Paris, France, as a member of the 29th Traffic Regulating Group. This group was responsible for controlling and regulating traffic in the Military Railway Service, in Marine Operations, and Motor Transport throughout the European Theatre for the Allied forces. After the war, Daniels remained in the Air Force until her retirement in 1964.

In this image, Mary Brockwell “Brockie” Daniels (foreground) is pictured surrounded by her WAC colleagues outside of their U.S. Army tent on an unidentified beach.

Credit line: Military Troops and Women’s Air Corps in Europe, World War II Folder, Brockie Daniels Papers, Outer Banks History Center

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This blog post is one in two-week series of posts sharing the items used in the exhibit titled “The Family Traditions of Service:  A Historical Tribute to Veterans.” This exhibit, on display from November 3 to November 13, 2015, at the Dare County Arts Council building in Manteo, N.C., is sponsored by the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center, the exhibit serves as a historical tribute to over 100 years of military service of North Carolina residents and their families, with particular emphasis on coastal North Carolina. The goal of the exhibit is to honor the role of North Carolina veterans and their families during peacetime and war. The items from this exhibit come from the holdings of the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina and the Outer Banks History Center.