Tag Archives: Genealogy

Finding Your African-American Ancestors Workshop, Feb. 21

[This announcement is cross-posted from the GHL Blog.]

FREE WORKSHOP

Finding Your African-American Ancestors

February 21, 2015, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Vault Collection, VC.42: The 13th Amendment to the United States Constitution. State Archives of North Carolina.

Vault Collection, VC.42: The 13th Amendment to the United States Constitution. State Archives of North Carolina

 

This session introduces research techniques for finding African-American ancestors prior to 1870.  We will discuss slave laws during this time period and what materials are available at both the Government and Heritage Library and the State Archives.

Program location:

Department of Cultural Resources Building, Room 208

109 E. Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27601

To register please visit the North Carolina Government and Heritage Library in person or call (919)807-7450 or email slnc.reference@ncdcr.gov.

This program is part of the Saturday genealogy workshop series sponsored by the North Carolina Government and Heritage Library and the State Archives of North Carolina.

Advertisements

Governor McCrory Proclaims October Archives Month

[This press release comes from Andrea Gabriel, Outreach and Development Coordinator for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

Part of the proclamation from Governor Pat McCrory's on Archives Month in North Carolina.

Part of the proclamation from Governor Pat McCrory’s on Archives Month in North Carolina.

Governor Pat McCrory has proclaimed October Archives Month in North Carolina. Part of a national American Archives Month celebration, it is a collaborative effort by professionals and repositories around the state and the nation to highlight the importance of historical records. In North Carolina, Archives Month is co-sponsored by the State Archives of North Carolina and the Society of North Carolina Archivists (SNCA). The State Archives and other archives around the state will present free public programs to celebrate the month. For information about activities visit SNCA’s website.

State Archives’ activities feature Home Movie Day on Saturday, October 18. Bring in your family films to share with others. Home Movie Day is a global event held in local communities around the world.  It provides an opportunity for attendees to bring in their home movies, learn more about their own family films, and—most importantly—watch and share them with others. Film archivists will be on site to share information about how to care for and preserve these family treasures. Home Movie Day will be held from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. in the auditorium at 109 East Jones St. in Raleigh.  For more information about Home Movie Day, visit the website of AV Geeks, http://www.avgeeks.com.

Discover your family’s past at the annual Family History Fair on Saturday, October 25. This year’s Fair focuses on genealogical information that can be found in ferry, road and bridge, and land grant records. State Archives staff will answer questions about the care and preservation of family papers and photographs. Ancestry.com will offer door prizes, including a gift card for a one-year World Explorer subscription to Ancesty.com, a certificate for a one-year subscription to www.fold3.com, a certificate to a one-year subscription to www.newspapers.com and a copy of Family Tree Maker. The Family History Fair will be held at the State Library/State Archives Building at 109 E. Jones St., Raleigh. It opens at 9 a.m. and presentations begin at 10 a.m. More than 25 vendors will attend including the Triangle Jewish Genealogical Society, Wake County Genealogical Society, Olivia Raney Local History Library, and the Family History Society of Eastern North Carolina.

 

About the State Archives of North Carolina

The State Archives of North Carolina State Archives collects, preserves, and makes available for public use historical and evidential materials relating to North Carolina. Its holdings consist of official records of state, county, and local governmental units, copies of federal and foreign government materials, and private collections. For more information about the State Archives, visit http://www.ncdcr.gov/archives/Home.aspx.

About the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Cultural Resources annually serves more than 19 million people through its 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the N.C. Arts Council, and the State Archives. Cultural Resources champions North Carolina’s creative industry, which employs nearly 300,000 North Carolinians and contributes more than $41 billion to the state’s economy.  Learn more at www.ncdcr.gov.

Free Workshop: Finding Your Female Ancestors, August 23

[This blog post is cross-posted from the Government and Heritage Library Blog, part of the State Library of North Carolina.]

FREE WORKSHOP

Finding Your Female Ancestors

August 23, 2014, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Bridal Party for Lillian M. Fowler, ca. 1890s

Bridal Party for Lillian M. Fowler, no date (ca. 1890s). From the General Negative Collection, State Archives of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC. Call Number: N_83_7_5

This program will explore resources and practices in finding the women in your family tree using research tools and materials in the Government and Heritage Library and State Archives of North Carolina.

Program location:

Department of Cultural Resources Building, Room 208

109 E. Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27601

To register please visit the North Carolina Government and Heritage Library in person or call (919)807-7450 or email slnc.reference@ncdcr.gov.

This program is part of the Saturday genealogy workshop series sponsored by the North Carolina Government and Heritage Library and the State Archives of North Carolina.

Discover Your Family’s Past at the Cultural Resources Family History Fair Oct. 25

[This blog post comes from a Dept. of Cultural Resources press release – you can find other news related to NC Cultural Resources here.]

Photograph of Will Tarkington and Mamie Lougee. Call number: PhC_160_4_24

Photograph of Will Tarkington and Mamie Lougee. Call number: PhC_160_4_24

Join us for the 3rd annual Family History Fair! This free event will include speakers presenting on various genealogy topics and exhibitor tables in the lobby of the building. This event is sponsored by the Government and Heritage Library of the State Library of North Carolina, State Archives of North Carolina and the Friends of the Archives.

Admission to the fair is FREE. Programming will be offered on Saturday, October 25, from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Archives & History/State Library Building in downtown Raleigh.

Click here for information on parking and here for directions.

Check back in late August for more details on our 2014 program.

 

About the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Cultural Resources annually serves more than 19 million people through its 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the N.C. Arts Council, and the State Archives. Cultural Resources champions North Carolina’s creative industry, which employs nearly 300,000 North Carolinians and contributes more than $41 billion to the state’s economy.  Learn more at www.ncdcr.gov.

It is time to celebrate!

Example of a land grant envelope, “shuck”

Example of a land grant envelope, “shuck”

In the mid-1980s the State Archives of North Carolina started work on preserving, microfilming and indexing the North Carolina Land Grants. I have not been part of this project since the beginning, but for the past 6 years one of my jobs has been to index the microfilmed North Carolina Land Grants into our MARS database, I have now indexed 133 reels of microfilm which is 25,899 land grants and I am very happy to say that the project is now complete.

To give an idea as to the scope of this project there are over 200 fiberdex boxes consisting of 216,024 land grants which in turn became 611 reels of microfilm. North Carolina Land Grants span the years 1679-1959 and are arranged by county including the Tennessee Counties that used to be part of North Carolina. Prior to the indexing of these land grants, which consist of a warrant, plat and often a receipt, they would have to be taken out of their envelope “shuck,” flattened ,deacidified, and repaired in the conservation lab. From there they would be microfilmed and then finally indexing could take place. The indexing of the land grants required the ability to read the microfilm of old and at times almost illegible script. The information captured in this indexing was information found on the envelope “shuck” which includes the county name, name of the grantee, number of acres, grant number, date issued, warrant number, entry number, date entered, book number, page number, location, and remarks. The location field often required researching the names of the counties’, cities, creeks, rivers, branches, and other geographical locations. This process could be time consuming because not only might the handwriting be hard to read but in many cases the spelling would be wrong or the names of geographic features would have changed over the years as well. There were also times that the names of the people listed on the shuck would be spelled different ways within the documents and shuck. In those cases I would try to determine, as much as possible, the correct name. But indexing also had its upside, including finding many interesting or humorous names, such as Ice Snow or the all-time favorite among staff working on the land grant project, Bold Robin Hood.

Although the process was long and tedious, this project will now enable researchers to view the North Carolina land grant “shuck” information online. Land grants can provide valuable information for many different researchers. Recently I learned that land grants were used to help reestablish the North Carolina-South Carolina border. Genealogists may also find information in land grants useful in their family research. Just remember that the information found in our MARS online catalog is the information found on the envelope, the “shuck,” at the time of the filming. If a researcher wants more information on the contents of the shuck they will need to visit our search room to view the microfilm, because the original land grants have been withdrawn from use as a preservation measure.

Now that this project has been completed I am on to a new project. Keep an eye out for news about a new addition to the North Carolina Digital Collections.

Genealogy Online: Navigating the State Library and State Archives’ Digital Collections

A webinar designed to give North Carolina library and archives staff an overview of the genealogical materials available in the North Carolina Digital Collections will be held tomorrow, June 19, at 10 AM. The hour-long webinar will be given by Ashley Yandle of the State Archives of North Carolina and Rachel Trent and Kathleen Kenney of the State Library of North Carolina.

Space is limited and registration is required. See this State Library of North Carolina blog post for more information and to register.

Addendum (repeated from the comments): For those of you looking for the recordings of webinars held by the State Library, they are available on the State Library’s website: http://statelibrary.ncdcr.gov/ld/webinars.html.

The direct link to today’s webinar is http://ncdcr.adobeconnect.com/p88qnx64i8n/

Slide from the webinar: Genealogy Online: Navigating the State Library and State Archives’ Digital Collections.

Slide from the webinar: Genealogy Online: Navigating the State Library and State Archives’ Digital Collections. This slide features a sample of photos from the Alien Registration and Naturalization materials available in the NC Digital Collections.

Also if you want to know more about the people featured in the Alien Registration and Naturalization slide (see a screenshot on your right), here is a bit more about them including their names, brief information about their occupation or country of origin, and the North Carolina county they were living in at the time.

Starting from upper left, moving to lower right: Mary Boswell Eite, British national from Shanghai, Mecklenburg County; Dr. Louise Dienes, a doctor and scientist from Austria-Hungary, Buncombe County; Yoshiko Brogden, Okinawa, Japan, and her daughter, Wayne County; Abraham Rutberg, a rabbi living in Fayetteville, Cumberland County; Elena Novas, originally of Mexico City, Mexico, Wilson County; Cordice Norman Heathersall, British dentist, Durham County; Anthony Randazzo, an Italian tailor, Craven County; Najala Kawaja, a nurse formerly of Canada, Mecklenburg County.

North Carolina Newspapers Available Online Through Chronicling America

Newspapers from North Carolina are now available online through Chronicling America,  a joint project by the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities to make available online United States newspapers published from 1836 – 1922.  The North Carolina newspapers were originally microfilmed by the Collections Management Branch of the  State Archives of North Carolina. The North Carolina Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is currently managing the digitization of the newspapers from microfilm, quality control, and other aspects of the project.  The first 33,500 pages submitted by UNC to Chronicling America include newspapers from Asheville, Raleigh, Tarboro, Boone, and Charlotte and are available online here. An additional 66,500 pages are anticipated to be added in the near future.

Read more about this project at North Carolina Miscellany.