Tag Archives: Friends of the Archives

Friends of the Archives Hosts “North Carolina and WWI” Event June 19

[This blog post comes from a Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources press release. You can find other press releases on http://www.ncdcr.gov.]

Logo for North Carolina and World War IRaleigh, N.C. – One hundred years ago, America entered the Great War and thousands of North Carolinians answered the call to serve their country at home and overseas.

To commemorate the centennial of the war, the Friends of the Archives will sponsor “North Carolina and World War I,” presented by Jackson Marshall, historian and deputy director of the North Carolina Museum of History. The free, public program will be held in the State Archives/Library Building, 109 E. Jones St., Raleigh, June 19 at 1 p.m.

After his talk, Marshall will lead a tour of the World War I exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of History located across Jones St. from the Archives Building. The 6,500-square-foot exhibition highlights artifacts, period photography, a trench diorama, historical film footage, educational interactive components, and video re-enactments that feature European and North Carolina soldiers and citizens to relate the stories of ordinary men and women from North Carolina who provided extraordinary service to their country 100 years ago.

Marshall is a native North Carolinian and the grandson of a World War I soldier. He received B.A. and M.A. degrees from Wake Forest University and is the author of “Memories of World War I.”

About the Friends of the Archives
The Friends of the Archives is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization formed in 1977 to privately fund some of the services, activities and programs of the State Archives of North Carolina not provided by state-appropriated funding.  The mission of the State Archives is to collect, preserve and provide access to North Carolina’s documentary history and culture.

About the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. NCDNCR’s mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state’s history, conserving the state’s natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development.

NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette’s Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C. Zoo, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Division of Land and Water Stewardship. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.

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Why We Search for the Lost Colony

SWR over recreated Raleigh map

Plan to attend Monday, June 6 at 1:30 as the Friends of the Archives presents “‘Bring Them Home’: Why We Search for the Lost Colony.” This free presentation will be held at the State Library/State Archives building at 109 E. Jones St. in Raleigh.  

The story of North Carolina’s “Lost Colony” is a simple yet compelling one. A late-16th-century effort to establish England’s first permanent settlement in the New World results in failure with the fate of its 117 colonists—men, women, and children—remaining unknown. But while this was just one of many similarly unsuccessful colonies, only this “Lost Colony of Roanoke” still asserts its emotional pull on public and scholarly imaginations across the centuries.

In the last decade, archaeological and archival research has produced new evidence not only of what fate befell Sir Walter Raleigh’s Roanoke Colony, but also of the enduring effects that enterprise wrought. Brent Lane has been an active participant and curious observer on these recent efforts and their often dramatic findings. Brent discusses what is known and what must yet be discovered if our generation of Tar Heels is to fulfill the best—and probably last—hope of recovering North Carolina’s “Lost Colonists.”

Brent Lane is a professor of Heritage Economics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Kenan-Flagler Business School where he is Director of the UNC Center for Competitive Economies at the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise. Brent works with several local, national, and international  organizations on the importance of natural and cultural heritage in conservation, education, and the economy.

This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Archives, a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization formed in 1977 to privately fund some of the services, activities, and programs of the State Archives of North Carolina not provided by state-appropriated funding.

Plan to Visit Treasures of Carolina: Stories from State Archives of North Carolina

[This blog post was written by Rebecca Lowe. Rebecca Lowe earned her master’s degree in public history from North Carolina State University, and is a member of the State Archives’ Exhibit Marketing Team.]

Flyer announcing the upcoming exhibit:

Flyer announcing the upcoming exhibit: “Treasures of Carolina: Stories from the State Archives of North Carolina”

What do you think of when you hear the word “treasure”? Many people think of items like gold, jewels, or antiques. The State Archives of North Carolina presents an altogether different concept of treasure in the exhibit Treasures of Carolina: Stories from the State Archives, to open October 24 at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh. Treasures, because these documents, records, maps, photographs, and other media are unique, irreplaceable, and sometimes quite valuable monetarily; Stories, because each item reveals the characters, narrative, and happenstance of how that document came to be and the significance of it to North Carolina’s history and culture.

Visitors will learn about the State Archives’ role in preserving materials that provide evidence of rights and liberties, document government actions and operations, and chronicle our state’s history and culture. A companion catalog with detailed information about the items on display will be available for purchase. It will also include additional items not showcased in the exhibit.

What is on display? The exhibit features both private collections and public records that supplement each other to reveal the nuances of our state’s history. The will of Mary Forsten, the earliest recorded North Carolina will dating to 1665, demonstrates the rarity of a woman property owner in the 1600s; a 1903 African American publication responds to the challenge of restrictive voter registration laws; the handwritten petition for citizenship from Chang and Eng Bunker, the famous conjoined twins from Thailand, reveals changing demographics in North Carolina, and a letter from wife to husband during the Civil War asks him to name their infant daughter.  Other materials document the way handwriting has changed over the centuries, reveal how and why electronic records are preserved, and present the varied formats of photographs dating from the nineteenth century. The exhibit also contains voices of World War I soldiers recounting their war experiences, black and white film clips of the small town of Hillsborough in 1939, and a Union soldier’s sketchbook of scenes on Roanoke Island in 1862.

Hungry for more information about the documents? Beginning next week, this blog will feature a weekly post about one of the artifacts on display so you can learn about its history before you visit the real thing.

While some materials will be available throughout the duration of the exhibit, some of the rarest items will be displayed only for a short time. These materials include:

  • October 24 – October 27: North Carolina’s copy of the Bill of Rights;
  • October 28 – February 7: 11th Amendment and James Iredell’s diary;
  • February 8 – February 14: 1663 Carolina Charter;
  • February 15 – June 14: Signature documents including items signed by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Albert Einstein, and Buckminster Fuller, among others.
  • June 15—June 19: North Carolina’s copy of the Bill of Rights

Plan to attend History `a la Carte on November 18 at the Museum of History from 12:00-1:00 p.m. when an Archives’ staff member will present, “What Records Reveal: the Story behind Treasures of Carolina.”

This exhibit is sponsored by the Friends of the Archives and runs through June 19, 2016. Additional funding was provided by the N.C. Bar Association Foundation, the Raleigh Times, and Wells Fargo.

Join us June 1 for the FOA Meeting and NC Barbecue Lecture

Barbequeing pork over an open pit near Rocky Mount, NC, September 1944. From the Conservation and Development Department, Travel and Tourism Photo Files. Call number: ConDev4648.5C. Learn more on Flickr.

Smoking pork over an open pit near Rocky Mount, NC, September 1944. From the Conservation and Development Department, Travel and Tourism Photo Files. Call number: ConDev4648.5C. Learn more on Flickr.

The Friends of the Archives (FOA) Annual Corporation Meeting and Program will be held on Monday, June 1, 2015 at 1:30 p.m. in the State Archives/State Library Building Auditorium (109 E. Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina).

The speaker will be Dr. John Shelton Reed who will talk about “North Carolina and the Original American Barbecue.” For more information, see the event flyer. The Friends of the Archives is grateful for the support of The Pit restaurant and their donation of barbecue samples after the program.

The Friends of the Archives is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization formed in 1977 whose mission is to support, promote, and strengthen the collections, services, and programs of the State Archives of North Carolina.  The mission of the State Archives is to collect, preserve and provide access to North Carolina’s documentary history and culture.

Announcing Treasures of Carolina: Stories from the State Archives

Photograph of Dr. Chase Ambler, nature enthusiast, stands on a cliff in 1910. From the Appalachian National Park Association, General Records, Western Regional Archives.

Dr. Chase Ambler, nature enthusiast, stands on a cliff in 1910; from the Appalachian National Park Association, General Records, Western Regional Archives. This item is among many that will be included in “Treasures of Carolina: Stories from the State Archives.”

The Friends of the Archives is pleased to announce an upcoming exhibit on the documents, history, and purpose of the State Archives of North Carolina. Treasures of Carolina: Stories from the State Archives will be open at the North Carolina Museum of History October 24, 2015 – June 19, 2016. Through a selection of documents from the Archives vault, unique letters, historical photographs, county and state agency records, posters, and digital media, the exhibit will illustrate the ways the State Archives documents state and county government, provides evidence of civil rights, and preserves the history and culture of North Carolina.

Sponsored by the Friends of the Archives, the exhibit will highlight rarely displayed archival materials, such as the 1663 Carolina Charter, North Carolina’s copy of the Bill of Rights, and a map dating from 1584, the oldest in the Archives’ collection. It will include fascinating glimpses into the lives of famous and not-so-famous North Carolinians through the documents they left behind, such as: a hand-drawn map from the Tom Dula murder trial; the 1665 will of Mary Fortsen, the oldest will known to exist in North Carolina; a rare 1903 African American publication created in response to changes in voter registration laws; the naturalization petition for Chang and Eng Bunker; and World War I photographs from North Carolina soldiers and sailors. The exhibit will also touch on current initiatives to capture and preserve online resources such as social media, GIS data, email, and government websites. In addition to materials from the collection in Raleigh, the exhibit will include items from the Archives’ regional repositories, the Outer Banks History Center (Manteo) and Western Regional Archives (Asheville).

While some materials will be available throughout the duration of the exhibit, some of the rarest items will only be on display for a short time. These materials include:

  • October 24 – October 27: North Carolina’s copy of the Bill of Rights;
  • October 28 – February 7: 11th Amendment and James Iredell’s diary;
  • February 8 – February 14: 1663 Carolina Charter;
  • February 15 – June 14: Signature documents including items signed by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, and Buckminster Fuller, among others.
  • June 15 – June 19: North Carolina’s copy of the Bill of Rights.

If you would like to support this event through a one-time donation, please visit the Friends exhibit web page for more information. Funding supplied by donors will be used for document conservation and framing, exhibit preparation, and informational materials.

About the Friends of the Archives

The Friends of the Archives is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization formed in 1977 whose mission is to support, promote, and strengthen the collections, services, and programs of the State Archives of North Carolina. The mission of the State Archives is to collect, preserve, and provide access to North Carolina’s documentary history and culture. Learn more at http://archives.ncdcr.gov/GetInvolved/Friends.aspx.

Friends of the Archives Meeting and Program, June 1, 2015

Barbecuing pork over an open pit near Rocky Mount, NC, September 1944. From the Conservation and Development Department, Travel and Tourism Photo Files. Call number: ConDev4648.5C. Learn more on Flickr.

Barbecuing pork over an open-pit near Rocky Mount, NC, September 1944. Conservation and Development Department, Travel and Tourism Photo Files. Call number: ConDev4648.5C. Learn more on Flickr.

The Friends of the Archives Annual Corporation Meeting and Program will be held on Monday, June 1, 2015 at 1:30 p.m. in the State Archives/State Library Building Auditorium (109 E. Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina).

The speaker will be Dr. John Shelton Reed who will talk about “North Carolina and the Original American Barbecue.” For more information, see the event flyer.

The Friends of the Archives is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization formed in 1977 whose mission is to support, promote, and strengthen the collections, services, and programs of the State Archives of North Carolina.  The mission of the State Archives is to collect, preserve and provide access to North Carolina’s documentary history and culture.

Discover Your Family’s Past at the Cultural Resources Family History Fair Oct. 25

[This blog post comes from a Dept. of Cultural Resources press release – you can find other news related to NC Cultural Resources here.]

Photograph of Will Tarkington and Mamie Lougee. Call number: PhC_160_4_24

Photograph of Will Tarkington and Mamie Lougee. Call number: PhC_160_4_24

Join us for the 3rd annual Family History Fair! This free event will include speakers presenting on various genealogy topics and exhibitor tables in the lobby of the building. This event is sponsored by the Government and Heritage Library of the State Library of North Carolina, State Archives of North Carolina and the Friends of the Archives.

Admission to the fair is FREE. Programming will be offered on Saturday, October 25, from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Archives & History/State Library Building in downtown Raleigh.

Click here for information on parking and here for directions.

Check back in late August for more details on our 2014 program.

 

About the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Cultural Resources annually serves more than 19 million people through its 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the N.C. Arts Council, and the State Archives. Cultural Resources champions North Carolina’s creative industry, which employs nearly 300,000 North Carolinians and contributes more than $41 billion to the state’s economy.  Learn more at www.ncdcr.gov.