Tag Archives: Electronic Records

Sunshine Week 2017: Text and Instant Messaging Guidelines Update

Visit our records management blog for an update on text and instant messaging guidance.

The G.S. 132 Files

The State Archives of North Carolina has released an update to its Best Practices for Electronic Communications Usage in North Carolina: Text and Instant Message document. Released in February 2017, this document is an update to the 2012 guidance document for state agencies using text and instant messages in the workplace, including employee responsibilities according to general statutes and records retention and disposition schedules.

IM and texting are methods of communication that can make communication fast and easy regardless of when or where the participants in a conversation are. They can be quick exchanges to arrange meeting for lunch, or they can be long exchanges about complex topics. But while IM and text messaging can make day-to-day communications easier, when they are used in the conducting of public business—and therefore the creation of public records—they can also make records management more complicated. GS 132 defines public records by content, not…

View original post 141 more words

Night of the Living Bit Rot and Other October News

It’s Halloween, which means it’s a good time to remind you to prepare for the Bit Rot Apocalypse.

This short film was created by State Archives staff as part of Electronic Records Day, along with several blog posts. They are among the many new items available online this October, including:

Several recent posts from our records management blog may be of interest to History For All the People readers:

In other October news, last week the State Library of North Carolina announced that NCpedia is getting a new look. They invite members of the public to help test the redesigned website and give their feedback.

Electronic Records Day 2015

October 10 (10/10) is Electronic Records Day!

Electronic Records Day 2015 logo

Sponsored by the Council of State Archivists, Electronic Records Day is intended to raise awareness among state government agencies, the general public, related professional organizations, and other stakeholders about the crucial role electronic records play in their world.

To learn more about what records managers can do to help preserve electronic records, see this post on the G.S.132 Files blog.

If you are on Twitter, you can follow the conversation about Electronic Records Day via the hashtag #ERecsDay.

The staff of the Digital Services Section has also created two Vine videos to remind everyone that digital preservation takes time and planning.

Preservation Week Quiz: Saturday’s Question of the Day

As part of Preservation Week 2015, the State Archives is partnering with the State Library of North Carolina on a Preservation Week Question of the Day – a series of questions related to the preservation of materials both physical and electronic. See the State Library’s blog to see their question of the day posts.

What kind of computer can open the files on this 3.5” floppy disk from 1990?

Dysan floppy disk

  1. Any modern Windows or Mac computer, as long as you buy an external floppy drive.
  2. A Windows computer from around 1990 running MS-DOS and having a working floppy drive.
  3. A modern Windows computer with special hardware installed inside the computer, plus an external floppy drive, plus special software to emulate a 1990 computer.
  4. There is no computer that can read the disk, because the insides of the disk have definitely deteriorated too much by now.
  5. There’s no way to tell. You can’t be certain about whether the data has survived or what it will take to access the files until you start experimenting with different hardware and software.

Do you know the answer?  Find out below the cut.

Continue reading

Making Digital Memories Persist

[This blog post was written by Kelly Eubank, head of the Digital Services Section.]

A whole generation has grown up with their lives recorded in digital form–photos, videos, class assignments, social interactions. For the digital files that are important to last, the creator must actively manage them. Digital files are vulnerable to loss from either human error (failure to be vigilant), natural disaster (hard drive failure or bitrot) or just plain neglect—unstable file formats, poor file naming, or failure to have multiple copies or move a file from a device before replacing that device.

People get new phones and new devices on average every two years. In order for digital files to persist, people can take some common, relatively painless actions. Firstly, because machines or devices may break, you should always keep multiple copies of files on different devices. If your phone has an option to back up your files to a cloud provider e.g. icloud or GoogleDrive, you should opt to do that. Additionally, we suggest you back up your device to a computer. As you run out of space on your device, you can transfer those to another machine that to delete them from your device. Second, not all file formats are equal. In the world of digital persistence, some file formats are more universally supported and can be read by different types of machines while others are closed and require a specific piece of hard ware and software to read them. For a list of recommended file formats, please consult our guidance document, “File Format Guidelines for Management and Long-Term Retention of Electronic Records.”

Last, when a machine or device saves a file, it typically either assigns it a name or will ask you to name it. If you don’t consciously name it something that will make sense to you now and in the future, you risk losing important files because you cannot remember the name of the file. This is particularly true with digital photos which inherit the name assigned to it by the SIM card. By renaming the file and organizing it according to function or event, you will better be able to discover it in the future. For more guidance on File Naming, please consult our guidance materials, “Best Practices for File Naming” or video tutorials on File Naming at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hi_A4Ywn4VU&feature=youtu.be.

For more tips and tricks, we invite you to take a look at our Digital Preservation Best Practices and Guidelines website at: http://www.digitalpreservation.ncdcr.gov/

Webinar: Digital Preservation for Individuals and Small Groups

[This blog announcement was written by Jennifer Blomberg, head of the Collection Management Branch.]

Digital Preservation for Individuals and Small Groups Webinar Viewing is TODAY!

Please join the Government and Heritage Library and State Archives today for the online viewing of Digital Preservation for Individuals and Small Groups led by the Library of Congress’s Mike Ashenfelder. This webinar will be a great introduction for individuals and representatives from small organizations who have interest in preserving their own digital photos, documents, recordings, videos, and other digital files.

The webinar will cover:

  • the nature of the digital-preservation challenge
  • simple, practical tips to describe and save digital files
  • tools that can be used

Location, Date & Time

 Archives & History–Library building

109 E. Jones St., Raleigh NC

TODAY

April 30, 2015

 Room 208  2-3 pm

 

Webinar Description

As technology changes, the greatest threat to preserving digital files is obsolescence. Files may get stuck on obsolete media or in some form that may become unusable in time. If you don’t actively care for your digital possessions you may lose access to them.

This webinar can help increase your understanding of what it takes to preserve commonly used digital files such photos, recordings, videos and documents. Learn about the nature of the digital-preservation challenge and hear about some simple, practical tips and tools to help you preserve your digital stuff.

Presenter

Mike Ashenfelder, Digital Preservation Project Coordinator, has worked at the Library of Congress since 2003 in the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program. He writes about personal digital archiving, leaders in digital preservation and issues and new developments in digital preservation. He also produces public information videos and podcasts. Before joining the Library of Congress, he worked for a decade in the Bay Area as a technical writer.

 

Preservation Week Quiz: Monday’s Question of the Day

As part of Preservation Week 2015, the State Archives is partnering with the State Library of North Carolina on a Preservation Week Question of the Day – a series of questions related to the preservation of materials both physical and electronic. Visit the State Library’s blog to see their question of the day posts.

When CDs first went on the market, sellers often claimed that the disks could last up to 200 years. Today, experts estimate that a CD will last how long if left on the shelf?

  1. 50-75 years
  2. 30-50 years
  3. 10-30 years
  4. 5-10 years

Do you know the answer?  Find out below.

Continue reading