Tag Archives: County Records

The Scary Truth Series, Pt. II

This is the second of three entries in a special Halloween-inspired blog series highlighting a collection of ghost stories, legends, folklore, and facts from North Carolina. Like sweet tea and college basketball, folklore is a major part of North Carolina’s cultural heritage. Legends and stories passed down from generations keep the state’s history alive and ultimately help us remember life as it once was.

The Scary Truth Series, Pt. I
The Scary Truth Series, Pt. III

Maco Light

Legend has it that a “ghost light” was all that remained from a fatal train accident that occurred over a century ago just outside of Wilmington in a small, unincorporated community named Maco. The details have become a bit fuzzy over the years, and after being told and retold thousands of times, the story has taken on a life of its own.

OurState

Illustration of the Maco Light by R. A. Sharpe in a 1956 issue of Our State Magazine. (source)

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Links to State Archives of North Carolina Materials

The newest addition to the North Carolina Digital Collections is Links to State Archives of North Carolina Materials. This ongoing digital reference collection is of original records from the State Archives that have been made available online by third party institutions. This collection is comprised of URLs to items within the various websites. Links may lead directly to an item or may link to collection landing pages on third party websites.

Links to State Archives of North Carolina Materials includes the following websites: Ancestry, FamilySearch, North Carolina Digital Heritage Center, North Carolina Maps, and YouTube. Several collections on Ancestry and FamilySearch have been partially digitized or are in progress, and therefore may not be complete. Also make sure to read the description of items within NCDC as some of the websites State Archives materials have been mixed with non-State Archives materials to form their final collection.

Please keep in mind that to successfully use the Ancestry links, your computer needs to be logged on an Ancestry account. If you are not logged in, the Ancestry links will take you to the Ancestry homepage. If you don’t have an Ancestry account, contact your local public library branch who may have a subscription or the State Library of North Carolina to gain access on site.

Record types include: North Carolina maps, a selection of North Carolina county records, and vital records. For a more complete list of record links included, see the landing page of the collection on NCDC.

If you’d like to see more materials related to North Carolina held at institutions throughout the state, please visit the State Library of North Carolina’s NC MOSAIC project on NCDC.

Onslow County Tax Records

The Imaging Unit of the State Archives of North Carolina has just completed imaging and creating microfilm for some Onslow County tax records.  The thirty-five new reels of microfilm have been added to the security vault and a reading copy of the microfilm has been placed in the public search room for public use.

The material includes [reel number and years]:
c.072.70002 Tax Scrolls 1925 1 vol.
c.072.70003 Tax Scrolls 1926 1 vol.
c.072.70004 Tax Scrolls 1927 1 vol.
c.072.70005 Tax Scrolls 1928 1 vol.
c.072.70006 Tax Scrolls 1929 1 vol.
c.072.70007 Tax Scrolls 1930 1 vol.
c.072.70008 Tax Scrolls 1931 1 vol.
c.072.70009 Tax Scrolls 1932 1 vol.
c.072.70010 Tax Scrolls 1933 1 vol.
c.072.70011 Tax Scrolls 1934 1 vol.
c.072.70012 Tax Scrolls 1935 1 vol.
c.072.70013 Tax Scrolls 1936 1 vol.
c.072.70014 Tax Scrolls 1937 1 vol.
c.072.70015 Tax Scrolls 1938 1 vol.
c.072.70016 Tax Scrolls 1939 1 vol.
c.072.70017 Tax Scrolls 1940 1 vol.
c.072.70018 Tax Scrolls 1945 1 vol.
c.072.70019 Tax Scrolls 1946 1 vol.
c.072.70020 Tax Scrolls 1947 1 vol.
c.072.70021 Tax Scrolls 1954 1 vol.
c.072.70022 Tax Scrolls 1955 Jacksonville: A&B Grocerita – Richlands: Hobbs, Acy Robert
c.072.70023 Tax Scrolls 1955 Richlands: Hobbs, Beatrice Davis – White Oak: Parker, R.L.
c.072.70024 Tax Scrolls 1955 White Oak: Parker, R. Nick – Grand Recap (end)
c.072.70025 Tax Scrolls 1960 Jacksonville: A1 Cleaners – Jacksonville: Afterlife
c.072.70026 Tax Scrolls 1960 Jacksonville: recap of White – Swansboro (white): Warren, William Pittman
c.072.70027 Tax Scrolls 1960 Swansboro(white): Warylk, Henry – grand recap (end)
c.072.70028 Tax Scrolls 1970 Corp. Excess & grand recap – Jacksonville: Pulley, Annie Rice
c.072.70029 Tax Scrolls 1970 Jacksonville: Pulley, Talmadge – Stump Sound: Proctor, Henry E.
c.072.70030 Tax Scrolls 1970 Stump Sound: Prouty, Roland A. – Richlands: Williams, Herman
c.072.70031 Tax Scrolls 1970 Richlands: Williams, H.L. Lloyd – Swansboro: grand recap (end)
c.072.70032 Tax Scrolls 1975 Recap All Townships – Jacksonville: Mead, William E.
c.072.70033 Tax Scrolls 1975 Jacksonville: Meadows, Billy G. – Jacksonville: Wainwright Transfer Co.
c.072.70034 Tax Scrolls 1975 Jacksonville: Walton Jewelers, Inc. – Stump Sound: Glover Sales, Inc.
c.072.70035 Tax Scrolls 1975 Stump Sound: Golden Acres, Inc. – White Oak: Padgett, C. M.
c.072.70036 Tax Scrolls 1975 White Oak: Painte, Virginia R. – Swansboro: Grand Recap (end)

To use microfilm please come to the main registration desk at the State Archives.  Once registered, a Reference Archivist can assist you in locating and using microfilm. To order duplicate reels of microfilm in Diazo, Silver Halide, or digital format contact Chris Meekins at chris.meekins@ncdcr.gov.
The Imaging Unit is in the middle of a small project for tax records.  As we complete more imaging projects, we will post the completed projects information.  We in the Imaging Unit hope that you the researcher will find these projects useful.

Mecklenburg, Orange, Perquimans, Person, Sampson and Warren County Tax Records

The Imaging Unit of the State Archives of North Carolina has just completed imaging and creating microfilm for tax records of six counties.  The seven new reels of microfilm have been added to the security vault and a reading copy of the microfilm has been placed in the public search room for public use.

The material includes [reel number and years]:

Mecklenburg County

C.065.70032 Tax list 1925; 1 vol.

Orange County

C.073.70021 Tax Scrolls 1929; 1 vol.

Perquimans County

C.077.70014 Tax List 1902; 1 vol.

Person County

C.078.70007 Tax Book 1904-1907; 1 vol.

Sampson County

C.087.70115 Tax List 1925; 1 vol.

Warren County

C.100.70003-70004 Tax Books 1936, 1942; 2 vols.

To use microfilm please come to the main registration desk at the State Archives.  Once registered, a Reference Archivist can assist you in locating and using microfilm. To order duplicate reels of microfilm in Diazo, Silver Halide, or digital format contact Chris Meekins at chris.meekins@ncdcr.gov.

The Imaging Unit is in the middle of a small project for tax records.  As we complete more imaging projects, we will post the completed projects information.  We in the Imaging Unit hope that you the researcher will find these projects useful.

Cabarrus County Tax Records

The Imaging Unit of the State Archives of North Carolina has just completed imaging and creating microfilm for some Cabarrus County tax records.  The eighteen new reels of microfilm have been added to the security vault and a reading copy of the microfilm has been placed in the public search room for public use.

The material includes [reel number and years]:

C.016.70013-18 Tax Scrolls 2000
C.016.70019 Tax Scrolls 1925
C.016.70020-21 Tax Scrolls 1930
C.016.70022-23 Tax Scrolls 1940
C.016.70024 Tax Scrolls 1950
C.016.70025-30 Tax Scrolls 1990
The Imaging Unit is in the middle of a small project for tax records.  As we complete more imaging projects, we will post the completed projects information.  We in the Imaging Unit hope that you the researcher will find these projects useful.

To use microfilm please come to the main registration desk at the State Archives.  Once registered, a Reference Archivist can assist you in locating and using microfilm. To order duplicate reels of microfilm in Diazo, Silver Halide, or digital format contact Chris Meekins at chris.meekins@ncdcr.gov.

First Wednesdays – Cohabitation Certificates

An example of cohabitation records indexed in the MARS online catalog.

An example of cohabitation records indexed in the MARS online catalog.

Collection Services Section Manager Debbi Blake wrote this month’s “First Wednesday” post for the North Carolina Civil War 150 blog. The post discusses cohabitation certificates and how they can be useful for researchers looking for records of African American marriages.

In addition to the blog post, there are other resources related to these records, including:

  • The MARS online catalog, which includes an index for many of the cohabitation materials.
  • The three-volume reference work Somebody Knows My Name: Marriages of Freed People in North Carolina County by County by Barnetta McGhee White, PhD.
  • Family Search page on the North Carolina cohabitation records.
  • North Carolina cohabitation records are available through Ancestry.com’s North Carolina, Marriage Records, 1741-2011 page.

 

First Wednesdays – Cohabitation Certificates

[This blog post was written by Debbi Blake, Collection Services Section Manager for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

With the abolition of slavery came many questions about the rights of freedmen, one of which was how to validate marriages. This was answered by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1866 with an act allowing formerly enslaved couples to register their marriages in the county of their residence. This act provided proof that such unions had existed, often for decades. In North Carolina, such certificates were called cohabitation records, most of which are housed in the State Archives of North Carolina. Couples were to appear before 1 September 1866, although it was later amended in order to extend the period until 1 January 1868. The overwhelming majority of couples came before the clerk of court or justice of the peace during the first targeted period of March to September. This stampede resulted in the thousands of certificates in the Archives. [Read more…]

Historic Paper Repair

[This blog post was written by Emily Rainwater, Conservator for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

How would you fix a torn piece of paper without tape? One way might be to take another, smaller piece of paper and glue it on top of the tear. This actually forms the basis of modern conservation repair work, though Conservators take great care when choosing both the paper and adhesive. The repair paper is usually an extremely thin tissue with long fibers and excellent aging properties, while the adhesive will be non-staining and easily reversible even with age.

 

Historic paper repair on MC.150.1775m, c. 2

Historic paper repair on MC.150.1775m, c. 2

 

Another way would be to sew the tear back together. This is seen more commonly with parchment as it tends to be sturdier and less likely to tear further from the stitches. However, if the paper is good quality and in good condition, it can be sewn as well, as seen in this example from the Northampton County Apprentice Bonds.

 

Northampton County Apprentice Bonds and Records, 1797-1888, 071.101.2

Northampton County Apprentice Bonds and Records, 1797-1888, 071.101.2 (Front)

Northampton County Apprentice Bonds and Records, 1797-1888, 071.101.2

Northampton County Apprentice Bonds and Records, 1797-1888, 071.101.2 (Back)

If a historic repair is still working and functioning properly, I will frequently leave it intact. However, if it is damaging the paper, either because it has caused a new breaking point or was done using harmful materials, I may remove it and replace it with a more conservationally sound repair. In the case of this Apprentice Bond, both the paper and repair were in good condition, so the sewing was left intact.