Tag Archives: Bible records

Final Bible Records Added to Online Collection

[This blog post comes from Druscilla R. Simpson, head of our Information Management Branch.]

In November 2008, the State Archives and State Library met and decided to work collaboratively on a digital records project that would combine the Archives’ family Bible records with the Library’s indexed marriage and death announcements from five North Carolina newspapers (Raleigh Register, North Carolina State Gazette, Daily Sentinel, Raleigh Observer, and News & Observer) from 1799 to 1893 created by Carrie Broughton.  In May, 2009, we went live with the North Carolina Family Records Online collection which included keyword searchable texts and images from these two resources.  At that time, only 175 Bible records (lists of birth, marriage and death information recorded in North Carolina Bibles) were available.

As of November 2012, the final 544 Bible records went online – bringing the total number online to 2154!  Since the project began, we have added photographs of the Raleigh Hebrew Cemetery in Oakwood, the records of the Historical Records Cemetery Survey done in 1937 for 97 counties of North Carolina, and thousands of pages of books and personal records from the State Library’s Genealogy Collection.

In addition to recording family vital statistic information, the Bibles contain  poems, obituaries, memorials, family letters, lists of slave births and deaths, news articles, temperance pledges, and even a few copies of wills and deeds.  For example there is a poem on “When to Wed”

Marry when the world is new;

Always loving, kind and true;

When February birds do mate;

You may wed, nor dread your fate;

If you marry when March winds blow,

Joy and sorrow both you’ll know;

Marry in April when you can,

Joy for maiden and for man;

Marry in the month of May,

You will surely rue the day;

Marry when June roses blow,

Over land and sea you’ll go.

They, who in July do wed,

Must labor always for their bread.

Whoever wed in august be,

Many changes are sure to see;

Marry in September’s shine,

Your living will be rich and fine.

If in October you do marry,

Love will come, but riches tarry.

If you wed in bleak November,

Only joy will come, remember.

When December’s snows fall fast,

Marry and true love will last.

 –M Fannie and C. Macon Walters

There are also beautiful pages such as the marriage certificate for John Cameron and Lelia Fowlkes of Rockingham, N.C.

Marriage certificate for John Cameron and Lelia Fowlkes of Rockingham, NC

Marriage certificate for John Cameron and Lelia Fowlkes of Rockingham, NC – part of the Bible Records collection available on North Carolina Family Records Online.

Transcriptions of these records have been done by State Archives and State Library staff, as well as by volunteers.  For example, more than 52 of the Bible records were transcribed by Pam Toms, a retired librarian and our most prolific volunteer on this project.  If you want to volunteer to transcribe genealogy documents, too, the State Library has a page dedicated to it here http://statelibrary.ncdcr.gov/digital/ncfamilyrecords/verticalfiles.html.  We have nine “super scribes” already hard at work and can always use more!  A terrific blog post about this transcription project can be read at http://statelibrarync.org/news/2012/11/world-usability-day-qa-with-therese.

As a result of putting these records online, more than 154 additional Bible pages recording North Carolina family births, marriages, and deaths, have been donated to the State Archives since May 2008.  If you have a family Bible that contains at least one person who lived or was born in North Carolina and has at least one birth or death dating to 1913 or earlier, then please consider donating copies of these pages to the State Archives.  Instructions are available at http://statelibrary.ncdcr.gov/digital/ncfamilyrecords/fhp_brochure.pdf

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State Library Hosts Family History Fair Aug. 11 for ‘2nd Saturdays’

[This press release comes from Rebecca Hyman of our sister organization the State Library of North Carolina.]

State Library Hosts Family History Fair Aug. 11 for ‘2nd Saturdays’

As part of the popular 2nd Saturdays program, the State Library’s Government and Heritage Library will host its very first Family History Fair, featuring speakers, exhibitors, and genealogy experts, on Saturday, Aug. 11.  The free event, which is also part of the State Library’s ongoing 200th birthday celebration, will be held in the Department of Cultural Resources Building, 109 E. Jones Street in downtown Raleigh, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Family History Fair will provide information and guidance for experienced family history researchers and beginners alike.  Children can learn what life was life in the 18th century, and enjoy a special children’s family history activity book.

Nearly 20 exhibitors and activities for all ages will fill the lobby of the building. Speakers and exhibitors include Library staff, genealogy professionals, State Archives staff and local family history organizations.  Click here to see a list of exhibitors. For more information call (919) 807-7450.

Featured Presentation and Activities include:

  • “We Have Stories to Tell: Family and Personal Stories” by Sylvia Payne, B.A. Sponsored by the North Carolina Humanities Council Road Scholars Program.  11 a.m.
  • “Exploring the North Carolina Digital Collections: Tips and Tricks for Genealogists and Historians,” by Lisa Gregory, Digital Collections Manager, Digital Information Management Program, Government and Heritage Library. 1 p.m.
  • “Ask the Genealogist!” The N.C. Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists will be available for free 15 minute research consultations. This service is on a first-come first-served basis. There will also be a German translator on hand to help decipher old German handwriting.
  • North Carolina Family Records Scanning Station. Visitors can bring North Carolina family Bibles and brief genealogies and letters to be scanned to be part of the N.C. Family Records Online Collection.  For questions, contact Druscie Simpson with the State Archives at (919) 807-7319.

About the State Library of North Carolina

The State Library of North Carolina builds the capacity of all libraries across the state, develops and supports access to genealogy and other specialized collections, and provides resources for the blind and physically handicapped.

About the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Cultural Resources annually serves more than 19 million people through its 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the N.C. Arts Council, and the State Archives. Cultural Resources champions North Carolina’s creative industry, which employs nearly 300,000 North Carolinians and contributes more than $41 billion to the state’s economy. To learn more, visit www.ncdcr.gov.   For more about 2nd Saturdays, and other events, visit www.ncculture.com.

Best State Websites 2011

For the second year in a row, Family Tree Magazine has placed the North Carolina State Archives on its list of “Best State Websites”  making us the only North Carolina website on the list this year. The magazine mentions our photograph collections and our digital projects, including our Newspaper Digitization project. Also mentioned are several of our joint projects with other state groups, such as North Carolina Maps (with the Outer Banks History Center and North Carolina Collection at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and North Carolina Family Records Online (with the State Library of North Carolina).

We at the State Archives are very happy and proud to be part of this list as it recognizes years of hard work and collaboration by our staff and our digital project partners.

Over 400 Bible Records Added to Family Records Collection

Today’s post comes from a Dept. of Cultural Resources/ North Carolina State Archives/ State Library of North Carolina press release:

Nearly 1,500 of the roughly 2,200  family Bible records in the State Archives collections are now available online through the Family Records Online Collection, a project of the State Archives and State Library. Since 2009, staff and volunteers have transcribed these mostly handwritten records to make them fully searchable in our online database. This recent addition includes family names from A to W, although the bulk begin with the letters M (including Mc/Mac), N, O, and P. In addition, 150 pages of Bible Records from the Daughters of the American Revolution are now available.

The Family Records Online Collection is comprised of Bible records — lists of birth, marriage, and death information recorded in NC family Bibles  throughout the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries —indexes to marriage and death records in (mostly) Raleigh newspapers, and photographs from Raleigh Hebrew cemeteries. Over time, Archives and Library staff hope to add the remaining Bible records, select genealogy publications, and other records that will assist anyone interested in researching their family’s connection to North Carolina.

The collection has been viewed close to 500,00 times. Visitors come from over 100 countries, every state in the U.S., and 310 cities in North Carolina. New donations have poured in since 2009, including those from Currituck County Public Library, which recently donated 57 records.

Still, the collection has no records from Graham, Madison, Polk, or Richmond Counties, and it is hoped that donations from private citizens or organizations can help fill out the collection. Bible records in which at least one significant family event (birth, marriage, death) takes places in North Carolina prior to 1913 meet the criteria for inclusion. For more information about donating records, see: http://statelibrary.ncdcr.gov/dimp/digital/ncfamilyrecords/fhp_brochure.pdf

This effort would not be possible without the ongoing collaboration of State Archives and State Library staff.

Civil War 150 Round-up

There’s been a lot of activity over on our Civil War 150 blog recently. I thought I’d mention a few of the highlights here, since I suspect that not all of the readers of this blog follow the other blog on a regular basis.

There have been new additions to our First Wednesdays project:

  1. February: the Peace Conference and Fort Caswell
  2. March: the Arkansas Resolutions and Hardship
  3. April: Gov. Ellis reply and the Faison Letter
  4. May: Secession
  5. June: Henry Lawson Wyatt

Video from parts of the symposium “Contested Past: Memories and Legacies of the Civil War: A Conference to Commemorate the Sesquicentennial of the Civil War in North Carolina” (the first of three North Carolina Civil War Sesquicentennial conferences) is now available. See this blog post for a list of YouTube videos available via the Dept. of Cultural Resources.

In “The Presentation, the newspaper, and the TV show” blog posts,  my coworker Chris writes about tracking down the H. A. Sledge testament – see Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3.

2010 Best State Websites List

Family Tree Magazine has put out a list of the “Best State Websites 2010” and the North Carolina State Archives is one of two North Carolina websites on the list. The magazine mentions our photograph collections and our digital projects, including our Newspaper Digitization project. Also mentioned are several of our joint projects with other state groups, such as North Carolina Maps (with the Outer Banks History Center and North Carolina Collection at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and North Carolina Family Records Online (with the State Library of North Carolina).

We at the State Archives are very happy and proud to be part of this list as it recognizes years of hard work and collaboration by our staff and our digital project partners.

August Additions to the NC Family Records Online

The State Library of North Carolina just announced that 320 new families have been added to the North Carolina Family Records Online collection. As of this month, nearly all of A-L of the State Archives’ Bible records have been digitized and added to the collection.

North Carolina Family Records Online is a joint project between the State Library and the State Archives.