Category Archives: Special Collections

Explore the Outer Banks Hispanic Community with the Mano al Hermano Records

[This blog post was written by Samantha Crisp, Director of the Outer Banks History Center.]

In recognition and celebration of the contributions and culture of Hispanic and Latinx Americans to our nation and society, Gov. Roy Cooper has proclaimed September 15, 2018 to October 15, 2018 as Hispanic Heritage Month for the state of North Carolina. In conjunction with Governor Cooper’s announcement, we would like to share one of our recently processed collections that directly relates to North Carolina’s Latinx community, the Mano al Hermano Records.

Clipping from the Outer Banks Sentinel, 23 March 2011, announcing grant funding for Mano al Hermano. From ORG.5284 Mano al Hermano Records, Outer Banks History Center.

Mano al Hermano (“My Hand to My Brother”) was envisioned as early as 2003, when
a Latinx support group for the Outer Banks community was founded by Sister Arcadia Rivera. After dying out, this group was revived by Ginger Candelora in 2010 as an affiliate with Interfaith Community Outreach. Candelora’s group was given 501(c)(3) status in April 2011 under a new name, Mano al Hermano.

Mano al Hermano’s mission is to serve the Hispanic and Latinx community of the Outer Banks by supporting literacy and education initiatives, offering English language classes, providing guidance on immigration and other legal issues, and encouraging collaboration between the Latinx and Anglo communities of Dare County. From 2013 to 2017, Mano al Hermano organized an annual celebration in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, first called the Hispanic Heritage Festival, and later called the OBX Latin Festival. The organization offers regular workshops and presentations on developing issues affecting the Latin American community as a whole and the Latinx community of the Outer Banks specifically, including changes in federal immigration policies (for example, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA), local resolutions relating to undocumented immigrants, and guidance on dealing with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials.

Program for OBX Hispanic Heritage Festival, 2014. From ORG.5284 Mano al Hermano Records, Outer Banks History Center.

One of Mano al Hermano’s early initiatives was to establish a community garden on Roanoke Island with the assistance of the Dare County Airport Authority. The goal of the community garden was “to provide affordable and accessible healthy food to locals while encouraging community involvement and interaction.” Mano al Hermano still operates this community garden today, with a special plot set aside for children affiliated with the organization to participate in a 4-H club called the “Mini Dirt Diggers.”

Another major initiative led by the group is the Family Literacy Program. This program involves home-based volunteer tutoring for elementary school children on a weekly basis as well as English language lessons for parents. The project is supported by community volunteers who act as tutors. The program also includes a special eight-week summer program culminating in and a field trip for participants hosted by the North Carolina Coastal Federation.

ORG.5284 MAH DACA Flyer

Flyer for DACA workshop, 2017. From ORG.5284 Mano al Hermano Records, Outer Banks History Center.

The Outer Banks History Center’s Mano al Hermano Records, 2010-2018, contains newspaper clippings, event flyers and programs, photographs, a scrapbook, and other papers created and collected by the organization from the time of its inception. Photographs in the collection mainly depict groups of children participating in various activities as part of Mano al Hermano’s Family Literacy Program and working in the community garden. For more details about the collection, researchers can view its finding aid, which is accessible in both English and Spanish.

Unfortunately, significant documentation of the Hispanic/Latinx community is lacking in many archives, including the State Archives of North Carolina and its regional units. Collections like the Mano al Hermano Records are indispensable to researchers attempting to understand the experiences, contributions, and stories of Hispanic North Carolinians. If you have original materials documenting the Hispanic community in North Carolina, are affiliated with a Latinx advocacy group, or would be willing to record an oral history interview about your role in the Latinx community, please reach out to us today to discuss donating your materials to our repository. We must act now to ensure that this important history is not lost!

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Document Facsimiles Relating to Blackbeard and the Queen Anne’s Revenge on Display at the State Archives of North Carolina

[This blog post comes from Donna E. Kelly, head of the Special Collections Section of the State Archives of North Carolina.]

A page of handwritten text of Court minutes for men accused of storing Blackbeard's booty.

Part of the General Court minutes for men accused of storing Blackbeard’s booty. Colonial Court Records. State Archives of North Carolina [call number: C.C.R. 103]

To commemorate the 300th anniversary of Blackbeard’s death, the State Archives of North Carolina is displaying several facsimiles of documents relating to his exploits along the coast, including his capture and death. The display, “Gone Out a Pirateing”: Blackbeard and the Queen Anne’s Revenge, is currently on display in the State Archives’ Search Room and will run through early October.

“Gone Out a Pirateing” features a 1709 map of North Carolina and pages from the Chowan General Court Papers and the Executive Council Journal, both dated 1719. They include descriptive testimony against Edward Thatch, otherwise known as Blackbeard. The display also includes photocopies of four documents from the British National Archives (formerly the Public Record Office [PRO]). They were obtained through the Colonial Records Project, an initiative in the 1960s to copy all documents pertaining to North Carolina that were filed in the PRO.

From September 18 through October 1, this small exhibit will be displayed on the second floor of the Archives and History/State Library Building (109 East Jones St., Raleigh). It will run Tuesdays through Fridays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and on Saturdays, 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. A digitized version of the document, with additional pages, is available for viewing 24/7 in the North Carolina Digital Collections.

Rare Irving Berlin WWII Play Photographs Online

[This blog post was written by Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

Photograph of songwriter Irving Berlin, wearing his U.S. Army uniform, standing against a wall next to a poster advertising the only civilian performance of Berlin’s traveling U.S. military play This Is The Army at the Teatro Reale dell’Opera in Rome, Italy, in June 1944. The play was in Rome performing for U.S. military personnel during an international tour in World War II (June 1944) [Photograph by: Zinn Arthur].

The State Archives of North Carolina’s Military Collection is excited to announce the availability online of 416 original photographs documenting the international tour of American songwriter Irving Berlin’s traveling U.S. Army play This Is The Army was performed from October 1943 through October 1945 during World War II. Developed from the 1942 Broadway musical play and the 1943 Hollywood film of the same name, This Is The Army (abbreviated by the cast and crew as “TITA”) was initially designed to raise money for the war effort in the United States, and featured one of the most famous wartime songs of the 1940s “This Is The Army, Mister Jones.” TITA became the biggest and best-known morale-boosting show of World War II in the U.S.

Beginning in October 1943, TITA left the U.S. for England, where it remained through February 1944. From there, they traveled to North Africa, Italy, Egypt, Iran, India, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Guam, Mogmog Island, Okinawa, Iwo Jima, Hawaii, and numerous other locations in the Pacific Theater. The play traveled with makeshift stages that they set up on numerous locations and U.S. military installations/camps. The play’s cast played to hundreds of thousands of U.S. service individuals, including women’s bases and camps such as the Women’s Army Corps (WAC) camps in the Pacific. They traveled by troop transport ships, rented cargo ships, and landing crafts.

View of African-American dancer, soloist, and comedian James “Stumpy” Cross introducing the song “Shoo Shoo Baby” during a performance by cast members of Irving Berlin’s traveling U.S. military play This Is The Army the hospital at Camp Huckstep in Cairo, Egypt, in August 1944. Part of the play’s “jam band” is pictured playing in the background. Photograph taken while the cast was stationed at Camp Huckstep to perform for U.S. military personnel in Cairo, Egypt, during an international tour (August 1944) [Photograph by: Zinn Arthur].

This Is The Army was the only full-integrated military unit in the U.S. Armed Forces during WWII, with African American men eating, performing, and traveling with their fellow white cast and crew members. Many of the men were not just performers before the war, but also recruited to perform in the cast from the U.S. Army ranks in 1943. The cast was all-male, which required the men to dress as women in drag for the women sketches in the play. In all, the play would prove to be the beginning of the eventual desegregation of the U.S. Armed Forces under President Harry S. Truman’s 1948 Executive Order 9981.

This particular collection of photographs was mostly taken by singer and later celebrity photographer Zinn Arthur. Arthur would select and send these photographs to fellow cast member and singer Robert Summerlin of Tarboro, N.C. Both men would add identifications to the images over the years, resulting in the collection currently held at the State Archives. This collection of the This Is The Army photographs is the only known, publicly-available collection of these images in the United States.

The complete set of photographs is available online in an album through the State Archives’ Flickr page. Original programs and tickets for the play are available for viewing in-house in the State Archives’ public Search Room.

Photograph of singer Robert Summerlin from the cast of Irving Berlin’s traveling U.S. military play This Is The Army, standing in front of a lifeboat on the deck of the small freighter El Libertador, which carried the cast and crew of the play around the South Pacific in May 1945 during World War II. The ship was in Manila, the Philippines, when the photograph was taken. Photograph taken while the play was traveling throughout the South Pacific to perform for U.S. military personnel during their international tour [May 1945] [Photograph by: Zinn Arthur].

Processing the Bill Harris Papers

[This post was written by Taylor Wolford, a summer intern at the Outer Banks History Center.]

When I began working at the Outer Banks History Center, I was familiar with the name Bill Harris. In 2014, I was a high school student and budding historian in Dayton, Ohio researching the history of flight. My history teacher suggested that I contact local historians in North Carolina to expand the scope of my research. I researched local historians to contact, including Bill Harris, as word had gotten out among researchers regarding his extensive collection of local photographs, oral histories, and documents.

As a graduate student in Archives and Records Management, I am now processing the Bill Harris Papers at the Outer Banks History Center for future researchers. My internship involves processing the collection according to current archival standards and creating a descriptive online finding aid for the collection.

In order to process the collection, I developed groupings, known as series, for the organization of the documents. A notable series in this collection is the Wright Brothers First Flight, which is beneficial for researchers interested in a variety of related topics, including the construction of the Wright Brothers National Memorial, the Anniversary of the First Flight, and the First Flight Shrine. Bill worked for the Wright Brothers National Memorial as an expert on local history, and documents throughout the collection showcase his work with the National Park Service and First Flight Society. Additional topics covered by the collection include Dare County, N.C. and the U.S. Lifesaving Service Stations.

Bill Harris (right) at the Wright Brothers National Memorial for the unveiling of the Barnaby Plaque on December 17, 1963. The plaque was a gift from the Soaring Society of America.

Perhaps the most impressive series, however, is Local Genealogy. This series contains a large number of oral histories, documents, and photographs that highlight the juxtaposition of an evolving yet deeply rooted Outer Banks community. The Local Genealogy series poses the most difficulties in terms of organization, for local families often intermarried until it was challenging to separate the Baums from the Harrises. As locals tend to say, “Genealogy in the Outer Banks is not a tree, but a vine.” For those interested in researching family histories in the area, the collection provides many opportunities to answer questions and delve deeper into the familial vines that constitute the Outer Banks community.

After two months processing these documents, I can verify that this collection extends far beyond my initial research in aviation history. Bill spent his entire lifetime immersed in the unique culture of the Outer Banks, and the collection certainly reflects his knowledge of the area. As the collection covers a wide range of topics and geographic regions, I am confident that it will continue to contribute to the research community long after it is properly stored in boxes and folders.

Members of Bill Harris’s family explore his newly processed collection with Taylor’s help, July 2018.

Housing 220 Drawings from a Black Mountain College Student

[This post was written by Kate Vukovich, conservation technician for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

Don Page, a young man wearing glasses, sits at a vertical loom, weaving. The picture is taken through the warp threads of the loom.

Figure 1. Don Page, a young man wearing glasses, sits at a vertical loom, weaving. The picture is taken through the warp threads of the loom.

Black Mountain College was an experimental liberal arts college in Western North Carolina, active from 1933-1957. One of its students was Don Page, who went on to become an architect, graphic and interior designer, and artist. The Western Regional Archives (WRA) has a collection (PC.1924) of his drawing studies and textile designs from his time at Black Mountain College, 1936-1942. These drawings are done in mixed media, mostly on paper (with a couple on wood) and were stored in folders organized by genre, but needed new housing to stabilize them. Because many of the materials used to make the drawings are friable—pencil, ink, charcoal, pastels, and other similar media—placing many drawings together without interleaving had led to smudging and media wearing off onto adjacent drawings.

A collage of six images of varying sizes and genres from the collection. Three are studies of violins, two are flowers, and one is an abstract color study on wood.

Figure 2. A collage of six images of varying sizes and genres from the collection. Three are studies of violins, two are flowers, and one is an abstract color study on wood.

Ultimately, we decided on making sink mats to accommodate groups of 5-10 drawings, which remained sorted by genre as they had originally been. Sink mats are a type of mat

Figure 2. A collage of six images of varying sizes and genres from the collection. Three are studies of violins, two are flowers, and one is an abstract color study on wood.

Figure 2. A collage of six images of varying sizes and genres from the collection. Three are studies of violins, two are flowers, and one is an abstract color study on wood.

that allows for the pressure of the cover of the mat, and anything that might rest on top of the mat, to rest on the material of the mat and rather than on the items themselves. It also allows for storing multiple items or thicker works than a traditional window mat.   Because many of these drawings were made with friable media like charcoal and pencil, it was important to make sure that they wouldn’t wear on each other any more than they already had. We chose to use PhotoTex paper as interleaving between each drawing. PhotoTex is designed to be ultra-smooth to not abrade photographic materials, textiles, and works on paper. Its smoothness means there’s little friction for it to pick up friable media.

We constructed the mats out of archival quality corrugated cardboard, making hinges on two sides so the drawings could be removed easily, and making a cover out of heavyweight cardstock. This was hinged to the mat with linen tape. While the mat base and cover were cut to a standard size, each mat is custom-fit to the drawings within (you can see the differences in the sizes of the drawings in the images below!).

Figure 4. Two completed sink mats of the same size are placed next to each other. One holds a small set of drawings (about 9 inches by 12 inches) and the other a large set (about 19 by 23 inches), demonstrating how mats are custom built to different drawings.

Figure 4. Two completed sink mats of the same size are placed next to each other. One holds a small set of drawings (about 9 inches by 12 inches) and the other a large set (about 19 by 23 inches), demonstrating how mats are custom built to different drawings.

The completed mats—with interleaved drawings inside—are put in boxes for convenience and additional protection. Forty-eight sink mats were made for about 220 items.

Figure 5. Five boxes are stacked on a table. The top box’s lid is removed, so the contents (the completed sink mats) are visible. A ruler is included for scale: the boxes are 25 inches by 32 inches.

Figure 5. Five boxes are stacked on a table. The top box’s lid is removed, so the contents (the completed sink mats) are visible. A ruler is included for scale: the boxes are 25 inches by 32 inches.

The WRA finding aid for the Don Page Collection is here. If you want to learn more about Black Mountain College, check out the NCPedia article, the NC Archives Digital Black Mountain College Collection, and the WRA finding aids of the Black Mountain College collections.

Treasures of Carolina: Pictogram Letter from Black Mountain College

PC_BMCPP_Blaine_Lorna_Rhebus_Letter_1941_001

Letter, 1942. Black Mountain College Project Papers, Western Regional Archives

 The first Wednesday of each month features a document or item from the State Archives considered a treasure because of its significance to the history and culture of our state or because it is rare or unique. Sometimes the featured item just illustrates a good story. The items highlighted in this blog have been taken from the exhibit, “Treasures of Carolina: Stories from the State Archives” and its companion catalog.

 Black Mountain College operated from 1933 to 1957 in Black Mountain, N.C. and attracted leading artists, both in in this country and abroad, to their faculty including painter Robert Rauschenberg, composer John Cage, choreographer and dancer Merce Cunningham, sculptor Ruth Asawa, architect Buckminster Fuller, and artists Joseph and Anni Albers.

This first page excerpt is part of a four-page letter written by Lorna Blaine (later Halper), an artist who attended the college.  She wrote to her parents around 1942 using pictograms. Part of the excerpt reads, “Dear Mother and Dad, I really do not know how to thank you enough for the wonderful trip to Boca Grande. It even started off well on the train, that snappy Silver Meteor. Then all the tennis and swimming and sunbathing and loafing and food etc. Gosh but everything was so marvelous!”

 

New Additions to North Carolina in World War I Digital Collection

As part of the statewide World War I commemoration, we have digitized 60 additional materials from the Military Collections and Private Collections of the State Archives of North Carolina. Most of the additions to the World War I digital collection are selections from the collections listed below.

Some highlights include:

PC.1385 Robert R. Bridgers Papers: Correspondence from Ann Preston Bridgers, who served as a YWCA hostess with the American Expeditionary Forces in France 1919. This is one of the few collections of non-combat women from the front in Europe.

PC.1560 Banks Arendell Papers: Arendell was part of the Machine Gun Company, 321st Infantry, 81st Division, American Expeditionary Forces, 1918-1919. His journal includes items such as Armistice Day on the front lines, and describing crossing the Atlantic in convoy.

WWI 106 John N. Hackney Sr. Army Field Notebook: Hackney’s original WWI Army field notebook with military training notes from when he was stationed in various training camps, including notes on infantry lines procedures and movements, Army code writings, mine warfare, and more.

PC_1138_Cherry_R_Gregg_Papers_Wartime_Diary_1918_09

Page from Wartime Diary of Robert Gregg Cherry

2017-18 additions to the World War I digital collection (North Carolina Digital Collections):

PC.8 Walter Clark Papers

PC.76 William Blount Rodman Papers

PC.100 Theodore F. Davidson Papers

PC.219 Edward W. Pou Papers

PC.1138 R. Gregg Cherry Papers

PC.1140 Reginald A. Fessenden Papers

PC.1165 Carl Brindley Notebook

PC.1234 Daisy Green Collection

PC.1308 Rodolph Nunn Papers

PC.1417 Leonidas Polk Denmark Papers

PC.1554 Bennet T. Blake Papers

PC.1697 George Carroll Brown Papers

PC.1739 William C. Lewis Diary

PC.1904 Richard Seawell Hinton Papers

WWI 1 North Carolina Council of Defense: Prosecutions Under Selective Services and Espionage Acts

WWI 35 Leonidas Polk Denmark Papers

WWI 84 Benjamin Ira Taylor Papers

WWI 86 Benjamin R. Lacy Jr.

WWI 87 Thomas A. Lacy

PC_1697_B1F1_Brown_George_C_Papers_Correspondence_048

Pillowcase from the George Carroll Brown Private Collection

WWI 88 North Carolina Distinguished Service Cross Awardees List

WWI 93 Jewish War Service Roster of North Carolina Small Towns

WWI 109 United States Army Troop Transport Ships List

WWI 118 113th Field Artillery Regiment Roster