Category Archives: Outer Banks History Center

Family Traditions of Service: Proposed Bombing Locations, Albemarle Sound Map

[This blog post was written by Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

Map: Locations of Proposed Bombing Location, Albemarle Sound, Date: Undated [ca. 1940s]

Map: Locations of Proposed Bombing Location, Albemarle Sound, Date: Undated [ca. 1940s]

As German submarines harassed the North Carolina and Atlantic coastlines in 1942 and 1943, the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard expanded training programs, coastal patrols, and communications systems to build up American forces’ efforts to protect the home front. Many coastal North Carolinians joined the Coast Guard, or traveled to Norfolk, Virginia, to enlist in the Navy.

This undated small, discolored map shows the location of bombing targets in the Albemarle Sound of coastal North Carolina as proposed by the U.S. Navy’s Fifth Naval District, based out of the Norfolk Navy Yard in Norfolk, Virginia. These sites appear to be bombing target practice, possibly for Navy ships, submarines, or aircraft. Its exact purpose is unknown, but it was produced during World War II as part of the increase in naval training and coastal protection around North Carolina.

To see this and other documents from the U.S. Coast Guard’s operations along coastal North Carolina, check out the County War Records collection in the WWII Papers, found in the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina.

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This blog post is one in two-week series of posts sharing the items used in the exhibit titled “The Family Traditions of Service:  A Historical Tribute to Veterans.” This exhibit, on display from November 3 to November 13, 2015, at the Dare County Arts Council building in Manteo, N.C., is sponsored by the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center, the exhibit serves as a historical tribute to over 100 years of military service of North Carolina residents and their families, with particular emphasis on coastal North Carolina. The goal of the exhibit is to honor the role of North Carolina veterans and their families during peacetime and war. The items from this exhibit come from the holdings of the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina and the Outer Banks History Center.

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Family Traditions of Service: Dedication of the Coast Guard Air Station, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Event Program

[This blog post was written by Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

Dedication of the Coast Guard Air Station, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Event Program, Date: October 17, 1940

Dedication of the Coast Guard Air Station, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Event Program, Date: October 17, 1940

Coastal North Carolina suffered from fears of and attacks by German submarines during World War II. On October 17, 1940, a major U.S. Coast Guard Air Station base was established at Elizabeth City, North Carolina, to work with personnel from the Coast Guard’s shore stations to rescue crews of tankers and freighters sunk by submarines.

This is the cover from the original dedication event program for that air station, which today comprises 800 acres in Elizabeth City. This rare document is the genesis of the Coast Guard Air Station, which is the largest and busiest Coast Guard air station in the United States.

To learn more about the Coast Guard’s operations during WWII in North Carolina, check out the WWII Papers in the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina.

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This blog post is one in two-week series of posts sharing the items used in the exhibit titled “The Family Traditions of Service:  A Historical Tribute to Veterans.” This exhibit, on display from November 3 to November 13, 2015, at the Dare County Arts Council building in Manteo, N.C., is sponsored by the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center, the exhibit serves as a historical tribute to over 100 years of military service of North Carolina residents and their families, with particular emphasis on coastal North Carolina. The goal of the exhibit is to honor the role of North Carolina veterans and their families during peacetime and war. The items from this exhibit come from the holdings of the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina and the Outer Banks History Center.

Family Traditions of Service: Coltrane Elementary Students Add to Scrap Pile, 1942

[This blog post was written by Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

Coltrane Elementary Students Add to Scrap Pile, Date: 1942

Coltrane Elementary Students Add to Scrap Pile, Date: 1942

During World War II, the U.S. government began rationing food and supplies to put towards the war effort. Shortages in metal and rubber demanded finding inventive ways of acquiring available metal and rubber supplies. Americans were urged to turn in scrap metal for recycling.

Schools were ordered to provide rationing programs for students and support war bond drives. Families supported public events and programs such as the scrap drives because they were patriotic and connected families in some way with their loved ones serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.

Perhaps one of the community scenes which stuck in the minds of so many from the war period was the community scrap heap. A pile of rusting metal and old rubber stood for freedom and democracy. Recycled scrap metal was used to build ships, tanks, planes, bullets, artillery shells, and other military supplies. This photograph of Coltrane Elementary School students in Concord, North Carolina, shows them bringing scrap metal and rubber tires to a scrap pile in 1942. Schools and communities all over North Carolina contributed to piles such as these, and local businesses and corporations converted the metal into weapons, vehicles and vessels, and supplies.

You can explore more about home front activities and rationing in the County War Records, found in the WWII Papers of the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina.

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This blog post is one in two-week series of posts sharing the items used in the exhibit titled “The Family Traditions of Service:  A Historical Tribute to Veterans.” This exhibit, on display from November 3 to November 13, 2015, at the Dare County Arts Council building in Manteo, N.C., is sponsored by the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center, the exhibit serves as a historical tribute to over 100 years of military service of North Carolina residents and their families, with particular emphasis on coastal North Carolina. The goal of the exhibit is to honor the role of North Carolina veterans and their families during peacetime and war. The items from this exhibit come from the holdings of the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina and the Outer Banks History Center.

Family Traditions of Service: American World War II Navy Vessel Clears Sea Mine

[This blog post was written by Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

U.S. Navy YMS-37 ship crew with a sea mine, Date: 1943 or 1944

U.S. Navy YMS-37 ship crew with a sea mine, Date: 1943 or 1944

During World War II, American Navy vessels traversed the Atlantic Ocean, North Sea, English Channel, and Mediterranean Sea while facing the menace of German and Italian submarines, magnetic and acoustic sea mines, and other war-time hazards in the European and North African theaters. Navy minesweeper ships consisted of crews specifically tasked with risking their lives to clear the water paths for Allied ships during the war, without which such landings as the Normandy D-Day invasion would have been impossible.

This snapshot photograph was collected or taken by Robert H. Northrop of Wilmington, North Carolina, who was serving in 1943 and 1944 aboard the U.S. Navy YMS-37, a minesweeping ship. This picture shows the ship pulling up next to an Axis Powers’ sea mine on the surface of the water. One of the crew is sitting on the mine doing something with the fuse—possibly trying to disarm it. Brave men such as these saved thousands of lives with their work.

You can see more photographs of Northrop’s service aboard the YMS-37 in the Robert H. Northrop Papers, located in the WWII Papers of the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina.

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This blog post is one in two-week series of posts sharing the items used in the exhibit titled “The Family Traditions of Service:  A Historical Tribute to Veterans.” This exhibit, on display from November 3 to November 13, 2015, at the Dare County Arts Council building in Manteo, N.C., is sponsored by the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center, the exhibit serves as a historical tribute to over 100 years of military service of North Carolina residents and their families, with particular emphasis on coastal North Carolina. The goal of the exhibit is to honor the role of North Carolina veterans and their families during peacetime and war. The items from this exhibit come from the holdings of the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina and the Outer Banks History Center.

Family Traditions of Service: “A Mission”

[This blog post was written by Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

“A Mission”, Artist: Joseph Albert HaymesJr

“A Mission”, Artist: Joseph Albert Haymes, Jr.

Originally from Virginia, Joseph Albert Haymes Jr. was a WWII sniper in Europe in the Third Army, under the leadership of Gen. George Patton. Haymes was awarded the Bronze Star as well as the Purple Heart for wounds while a sniper. Before the war, he studied at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh. While in Europe, he created drawings and paintings during his downtime which demonstrated his views and the mood of Americans in WWII. Haymes came to Winston-Salem, North Carolina, in 1950, and was a partner in one of North Carolina’s most important advertising firms—Long, Haymes and Carr, Inc.

This undated drawing by Haymes shows a soldier (possibly a sniper) slumped in a chair with his rifle propped up against a wall in a partially bombed-out building, with explosions occurring in the background. This is possibly a self-portrait of Haymes, drawn while he was in Europe. Note the melancholy mood of the piece, which may reflect Haymes’ attitudes towards his job as a sniper. It reflects the traumatic nature of war as experienced by an American soldier.

Credit line: ©Joseph Albert Haymes Jr., Accession # 2015.5.71, Military Collection, State Archives of North Carolina

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This blog post is one in two-week series of posts sharing the items used in the exhibit titled “The Family Traditions of Service:  A Historical Tribute to Veterans.” This exhibit, on display from November 3 to November 13, 2015, at the Dare County Arts Council building in Manteo, N.C., is sponsored by the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center, the exhibit serves as a historical tribute to over 100 years of military service of North Carolina residents and their families, with particular emphasis on coastal North Carolina. The goal of the exhibit is to honor the role of North Carolina veterans and their families during peacetime and war. The items from this exhibit come from the holdings of the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina and the Outer Banks History Center.

Family Traditions of Service: “Piping All Hands for the U.S. Coast Guard” Recruitment Booklet

[This blog post was written by Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

“Piping All Hands for the U.S. Coast Guard” Recruitment Booklet, Date: 1942

“Piping All Hands for the U.S. Coast Guard” Recruitment Booklet, Date: 1942

This 1942 fold-out recruitment booklet for the U.S. Coast Guard was used in North Carolina to advertise for civilians with specialty training to enlist in the Coast Guard for advanced pay. Recruitment materials in World War II were somewhat misleading: many men and women who enlisted for one job or role often were transferred to another position depending on the military branch’s need.

This fold-out booklet shows on the inside the specialty ratings and jobs for which civilian experience would transfer under the Coast Guard. It details      the roles and skills needed for these jobs—many of which North Carolina men and women fulfilled in the Coast Guard in North Carolina and overseas. The booklet uses interesting and dynamic graphics to communicate to potential recruits about the need for their service to their country. WWII propaganda and recruitment materials took advantage of photography and artwork to convey patriotism, a sense of duty, and career opportunities to Americans’ facing the option of being drafted, or choosing their branch of service by enlisting.

Learn what other types of imagery and messages the U.S. Coast Guard used to recruit individuals in WWII by checking out the Recruiting Materials collection of the WWII Papers, found in the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina.

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This blog post is one in two-week series of posts sharing the items used in the exhibit titled “The Family Traditions of Service:  A Historical Tribute to Veterans.” This exhibit, on display from November 3 to November 13, 2015, at the Dare County Arts Council building in Manteo, N.C., is sponsored by the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center, the exhibit serves as a historical tribute to over 100 years of military service of North Carolina residents and their families, with particular emphasis on coastal North Carolina. The goal of the exhibit is to honor the role of North Carolina veterans and their families during peacetime and war. The items from this exhibit come from the holdings of the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina and the Outer Banks History Center.

 

Family Traditions of Service: Untitled Painting [Soldiers in a Room], 1945

[This blog post was written by Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

Untitled Painting [Soldiers in a Room] (front), Artist: Joseph Albert Haymes Jr.

Untitled Painting [Soldiers in a Room] (front), Artist: Joseph Albert Haymes Jr.

Originally from Virginia, Joseph Albert Haymes Jr. was a WWII sniper in Europe in the Third Army, under the leadership of Gen. George Patton. Haymes was awarded the Bronze Star as well as the Purple Heart for wounds while a sniper. Before the war, he studied at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh. While in Europe, he created drawings and paintings during his downtime which demonstrated his views and the mood of Americans in WWII. Haymes came to Winston-Salem, North Carolina, in 1950, and was a partner in one of North Carolina’s most important advertising firms—Long, Haymes and Carr, Inc.

This color painting on paper of three soldiers (believed to be Americans) shows the inside of a room with a table and a window. One soldier is standing and lighting a cigarette. Two soldiers are sitting at a table, with one facing away from the viewer and wearing headphones, listening to a reel-to-reel tape machine. It was painted in 1945 by Haymes while he was in Linz, Austria—possibly on occupation duty.

Untitled Painting [Soldiers in a Room] (back), Artist: Joseph Albert Haymes Jr.

Untitled Painting [Soldiers in a Room] (back), Artist: Joseph Albert Haymes Jr.

Back of painting: Due to limited art supplies while involved in the war, note how Haymes utilizes the back of a regular piece of paper as his color mixing palette. This shows how a soldier on the front lines still managed to do art under hostile circumstances, often to help him cope with the chaos around him and provide some level of normalcy amidst the chaos.

Credit line: ©Joseph Albert Haymes Jr., Accession # 2015.5.71, Military Collection, State Archives of North Carolina

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This blog post is one in two-week series of posts sharing the items used in the exhibit titled “The Family Traditions of Service:  A Historical Tribute to Veterans.” This exhibit, on display from November 3 to November 13, 2015, at the Dare County Arts Council building in Manteo, N.C., is sponsored by the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center, the exhibit serves as a historical tribute to over 100 years of military service of North Carolina residents and their families, with particular emphasis on coastal North Carolina. The goal of the exhibit is to honor the role of North Carolina veterans and their families during peacetime and war. The items from this exhibit come from the holdings of the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina and the Outer Banks History Center.