Author Archives: rosefortierncdcr

McCrory, Hunt, and Martin Papers added to Governors Papers, Modern

We have added new materials to the Governors Papers, Modern digital collection. The executive orders and proclamations of Governor Pat McCrory are now available, as are the executive orders of Governors James B. Hunt, Jr., and James G. Martin. Governor McCrory’s first executive order was to establish a procedure for the appointment of justices and judges, while his final order at the end of December 2016 was to extend the Substance Abuse Task Force. Governor Hunt’s first executive order establishing his North Carolina Board of Ethics and the rules under which it would operate. Governor Martin’s first proclamation also dealt with the North Carolina Board of Ethics, and is strikingly similar to that of Governor Hunt.

These documents, and more modern governors’ papers can be found in the North Carolina Digital Collections: Governors Papers, Modern.

The online collection contains only a small percentage of the total governors papers in the holdings of the State Archives, which include papers from Richard Caswell (1776 – 1780) through Pat McCrory (2012 – 2016).

For biographies of North Carolina governors and colonial governors, consult NCPedia at http://www.ncpedia.org/biography/governors.

For finding aids for many governors’ papers collections, see the Guides to the Governors Papers on the State Archives website.

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Senate Audio 1977-1978

senateThe Senate Audio digitization project has begun a new chapter. Current audio holdings cover the years 2006 through 2012. We recently began digitizing the State Archives’ extensive Senate Audio cassette collection, starting with the 1977-1978 biennium. Cassette recording of senate sessions started on the 79th day of the 1977 session. Currently, recordings available on Internet Archive (linked from our digital Senate Audio collection) run from May 2, 1977-June 16, 1978. The collection continues to grow as we start the 1979-1980 biennium.

Recordings of years not yet digitized are held at the State Archives and made available through a fee-based, digitization-on-demand basis. Additional information regarding fees can be found here. More Senate-related materials found in the Archives include the Senate Clerk’s Office journals (SR 66.28) which provide the daily minutes from 1777 through 1981.

Digital Services Section New Staff Introduction Series

Since the start of 2017, several new staff members have joined the Digital Services Section. All of us will be making regular blog posts on History For All the People, so we thought it would be nice for each of us to introduce ourselves, describe our roles in DSS, and preview the projects we’re working on.

Introducing Anna Spencer: Summer Intern in the Digital Services Section

Hi! I’m an intern with the digital services section through the State of NC Internship. The State of NC Internship is run by the NC Council for Women & Youth Involvement. The internship provides an opportunity for students to gain experience in state government workplaces, by placing students in a variety of positions across the state for a 10-week period.

I am currently a graduate student in the dual degree archival program between NC State and UNC. I will be at State until this spring working on a Master’s in Public History, and in the spring I will go to UNC to start working towards a Master’s in Library Sciences. I earned my Bachelor’s of Science in History with a concentration in Public History in May 2017 from Appalachian State University. While at Appalachian State, I worked at a historic house and community center, which provided many opportunities to interact with the public and learn more about local history. This internship is my first professional foray into archives, and I have been enjoying it immensely.

Social Hour Hostess Alabama Jeanes Teacher

The only know instance of a peanut in the State Archives collections.

I am working with the African American Education Digital Collection, digitizing files from the Division of Negro Education. So far, I have digitized the correspondence of the Director of the Division of Cooperation in Education and Race Relations and the papers of the State Supervisor of Elementary Education. It has been very interesting to see how race relations changed during the mid-twentieth century, as well as seeing how involved universities in the Triangle were in these efforts. My research focus is postwar African American urban history, so learning more about the history of African American education in the state has given me new perspectives to consider as a researcher.

More Historical Governors’ Papers Added to North Carolina Digital Collections

William Tryon Proclamation

A proclamation from colonial North Carolina William Tryon.

The Historical Governors’ Papers collection has been going strong. In the past year, we transferred papers from North Carolina’s colonial governors into the collection. Those were originally housed in MARS, the online catalog for the State Archives, but are now available in the North Carolina Digital Collections.

North Carolina’s colonial governors were appointed by the King of England to administer his interests in the colonies. The documents record mainly the day-to-day workings of government through 1775, after Josiah Martin had fled his post in New Bern. The papers, mainly correspondence, shed light on events both large and small that took place during each man’s tenure.

The holdings are not exhaustive as papers were considered to belong to each individual, not to the government as a whole. We have documents from the following governors:

We’ve also added papers for Governors Benjamin Smith and William Hawkins. Smith was elected as Governor for one term (1810-1811), he had a benevolent nature and was well-educated, but also had an irascible disposition, and chose to settle disputes by duel. His more frequent opponents were blood kin or political antagonists, and he was twice wounded in these encounters.

Hawkins was elected as Governor for three terms (1811-1814), he served as chief executive during the War of 1812. His third and last term as governor ended only weeks prior to the war’s conclusion.

Finally, we’ve recently begun adding papers for Governor Thomas W. Bickett. Bickett was North Carolina’s governor from 1917-1921. As wartime governor, Bickett cooperated fully with the national authorities during the crisis of 1917-18. Bickett’s initiatives met remarkable success with the legislature adopting forty of forty-eight proposals during his term. The parole system was overhauled and the legislature, with the Governor’s endorsement, approved a $3 million bond program to permit expansion at state colleges and universities and increased funds for the charitable institutions. Tax reform measures modernized the state’s revenue structure.

North Carolina’s Very Own Dog: The Plott Hound

Plott Hounds

Big Tom Wilson Bear Camp, Pensacola, NC, (Yancey County) December 1945, photo taken by Springfield. From the North Carolina Conservation and Development Department, Travel and Tourism Division photo files, North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, NC.

No other dog fits the description of North Carolina’s very own dog better than the Plott Hound. One of only four officially recognized dog breeds to have originated in the United States, it is the only one to have been developed in this state. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1998, but the Plott Hound (or just plain Plott) was adopted as the state dog in 1989.

The breed is unique in a number of ways, from its ancestry to its history. Unlike the rest of the coonhound breeds, the Plott is descended from German “Hanover hounds,” rather than the more typical English Foxhounds. The breeds’ ancestors were brought to North Carolina in 1750 when Johannes Plott immigrated to the US. He and his family moved around in the state, finally settling in the mountains. Everywhere they went, so too did Johannes’ dogs. The dogs were used to protect shooting preserves and livestock from bears, boars, and wolves. Therefore, the dogs had to be fearless and smart.

After Johannes’ death, his son John continued to develop the breed through selective breeding practices and by the mid- to late 1800s, people were traveling to Haywood County to procure these dogs from the Plott family.

The breed is prized for its temperament and performance, chief among them its tenacity. The dogs were bred especially for stamina, something still noted in the AKC’s breed standard. This tenacity made the dogs especially valuable to big game hunters. The dogs are noted scent hounds and have been known to track quarry for days when necessary.

Plott Hound at Rest

Bear Hunt-near Robbinsville, NC, 1940. From Conservation and Development Department, Travel and Tourism Division Photo Files, North Carolina State Archives.

The breed’s physical standards describe medium-sized a dog at 20-25 inches tall, that weighs 40-60 pounds. It has a long tail, and wide, medium-sized ears. Its legs are strong and muscular for speed and agility, assets for hunting. It may have white, black, or even red nails. The coat is short and smooth, in black, brown, or any shade of brindle.

Owners and breeders of Plotts are passionate about their dogs, and as with any passion, there will be disagreements. Since the dog was first recognized as a distinct breed by the United Kennel Club in 1946, there have been arguments over what constitutes a “true” Plott. Arguments center around coat color and how much outbreeding is permissible before a dog is no longer considered a Plott.

The State Archives has many photos of Plott Hounds.

Digital Services Section New Staff Introduction Series

Since the start of 2017, several new staff members have joined the Digital Services Section. All of us will be making regular blog posts on History For All the People, so we thought it would be nice for each of us to introduce ourselves, describe our roles in DSS, and preview the projects we’re working on.

Introducing Rose Fortier: Metadata Archivist in the Digital Services Section

I’m starting my fourth week with the State Archives of North Carolina. It’s an interesting time in this latest chapter of my work history. Things are starting to come together, and I feel like I’m getting to the point where I can contribute to the team here, instead of spending all my time asking questions.

One of the reasons I was excited to start working here was that I knew I’d get to handle all sorts of fascinating historical documents in the course of digitizing them and making them available for access online. The course of my career in libraries and archives is approaching thirteen years (which is a little scary when I sit down and think about it), and I’ve spent much of that time working with digital collections.

I started out as a baby librarian doing work for the Milwaukee Public Library. Yes, that’s Milwaukee, Wisconsin, home of beer, brats, and cheese. I’m not from there originally, but that’s where I had my first job fresh out of library school. I was assigned to work in the Humanities Department, a subject unit at the Central Library that worked mainly with local history and genealogy materials. After not too long, I found myself in charge of the Historic Photo Archives there, which led to my first forays in digitization. Eventually, I would become the Digital Projects Librarian, and our digital collections really started to take shape. One of the things I really loved about my work at MPL was how much I learned about the history of the city. Before too long, I had in-depth knowledge of Milwaukee that rivaled that of most life-long inhabitants.

From there, I went to work at Marquette University, also in Milwaukee. In fact, I moved about six blocks west down Wisconsin Avenue. My job there was similar to what I’d been doing for MPL, except the focus was different. Instead of making Milwaukee’s historical materials available, I was working on making the research output of Marquette’s faculty and students more easily accessible. I learned new techniques, got to work with different formats and equipment. It was interesting and important work, and I learned a lot, but I missed the parts where I got to learn about the history of the city.

This is why I’m so happy to be working here. Once again, I find myself somewhere where I’m a stranger. As a Canadian by birth, this is as far south as I’ve ever lived. So not only am I learning a lot about North Carolina, but I’m also learning about the South. The stories I’m running across as I work with documents from the General Assembly during the Revolutionary War are deeply fascinating, and I’ll be sure to share some of the tidbits I find. I’m also working with an unprocessed collection of documents relating to the Future Homemakers of America, and I’m rapidly learning more about that organization (established in 1945, segregated until 1965, details to come). I’m eager to learn even more about the state I now call home, and to see how I can use that knowledge to make its treasures available to the public.