Author Archives: avgabriel2

Do You Need Help Digitizing Your Collections?

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Landscape drawing, Doan Ogden Color illustrations, Western Regional Archives

Apply by March 16!!!

If you have collections relevant to North Carolina’s history and culture, a grant-funded program may help you get them digitized.

A grant awarded to the State Historical Records Advisory Board and the State Archives of North Carolina provides for the transport, scanning, and online publishing of North Carolina historical records and archival materials through partnership with the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center at UNC-Chapel Hill University Library.  As part of this program, workshops will be offered that teach the basics of preparing collections to be scanned.

Eligibility. Any North Carolina institution that holds archival records documenting North Carolina history and culture and whose facilities and collections are open to the public may apply to the program—libraries, archives, historical and genealogical societies, museums, and other institutional and organizational archives are eligible. TAP (Traveling Archivist Program) participants are encouraged to apply.

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Treasures of Carolina: the Carolina Charter of 1663

The first Wednesday of each month will feature a document or item from the State Archives considered a treasure because of its significance to the history and culture of our state or because it is rare or unique. Sometimes the featured item just illustrates a good story. The items highlighted in this blog have been taken from the exhibit, “Treasures of Carolina: Stories from the State Archives” and its companion catalog.

Detail NC_Charter-Pg1

Page 1 of the Carolina Charter features an elaborate drawing of King Charles

Considered the “birth certificate” of the Carolinas, the Carolina Charter of 1663, so named after King Charles II of England, gave the province of Carolina to eight of his loyal supporters, known later as Lords Proprietors of Carolina, in return for their service to the Crown during the English Restoration.  The original Charter designated land between 31°and 36° north latitude and extending east to west, ocean to ocean, covering parts of what is now Florida, Mexico, Texas, and California.

Written on vellum (calf- or sheepskin), this remarkable document is composed of four pages and bears a striking pen-and-ink portrait of King Charles II of England on the first page. The Charter marks the beginning of organized, representative government in the province of Carolina, granting to the colonists rights that were to have lasting influence on the region’s population and its history. For example, the Charter guaranteed the rights of property ownership, the establishment of courts, and representation of delegates of “Freemen of said Province.”

The Carolina Charter of 1663 is both a government document—as a land grant and a treatise for governing—and a work of art.  In 1949, using privately-donated funds, the Department of Archives and History paid $6,171 for its purchase from a bookseller in England. Two years of research on both sides of the Atlantic had confirmed the Charter’s authenticity. Today it is housed in one of two climate-controlled security vaults in the State Archives. Because of preservation concerns and its intrinsic and documentary value its display is carefully monitored.

Apply Now for the Traveling Archivist Program

The Traveling Archivist Program is Now Soliciting Applications

APPLICATION DEADLINE: JANUARY 5, 2018

The State Archives of North Carolina can help with the preservation of and access to your historical collections

Plan of a tract of land situated in the counties of Franklin and Wake, NC, the property of William M. Jeffreys, Esqr.

Plan of a tract of land situated in the counties of Franklin and Wake, NC, the property of William M. Jeffreys, Esqr. [Call number: MC.039.1832b]

TAP provides hands-on preservation assistance to cultural and heritage institutions that house archives, papers, and records at risk of deterioration and damage. The purpose of TAP is to help improve preservation of and access to collections that document the culture and history of our state.

Institutions chosen to participate in this program will receive an onsite visit from to:

  • Conduct a collections assessment of your collection
  • Discuss your policies and procedures
  • Provide suggestions for collection processing
  • Deliver supply catalogs and some basic supplies
  • Present a final report of the site visit with full recommendations for improving the care and management of your collection

The application is open to all North Carolina cultural and heritage institutions that house and maintain active historical collections, and whose collections are accessible to the public.  Those institutions housing solely objects or artifacts are ineligible for this program.

The guidelines and application may be accessed online and application deadline is January 5, 2018. Questions relating to the application process may be addressed to Andrea Gabriel, North Carolina State Archives, 919-807-7326, andrea.gabriel@ncdcr.gov, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Using Primary Sources in the Classroom: New Online Lesson Plans and Tutorials

Lesson plans and tutorials can help social studies teachers engage their students with primary sources such as maps, photographs, letters, and contemporary newspaper accounts.

The North Carolina State Historical Records Advisory Board (SHRAB) and the State Archives of North Carolina have produced these tools for teachers and students in a program titled, “Teaching Digital North Carolina.”

Lesson Plans include

  •  “Agriculture and Textiles: Interaction of Two Major North Carolina Industries”
  • “Civil Rights: Circle of Viewpoints”
  • “World War I: The Role of North Carolinians in World War I”

Tutorials include

  • “Using the Digital Public Library of America to Access North Carolina Sources”
  • “Teaching Sensitive Subjects”
  • “Teaching with Primary Sources”

Each lesson plan topic has a list of additional primary sources from digitized collections throughout state. There are nearly 400,000 primary and secondary records from more than 120 repositories collected on the website of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA).

Teaching Digital North Carolina was made possible with funds from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, the funding arm of the National Archives.

State Archives Celebrates Archives Month with Free Public Programs

Governor Roy Cooper has proclaimed October 2017 as North Carolina Archives Month and the State Archives of North Carolina presents several programs exploring the relevance of historical records in our lives today.

Home Movie Day

Saturday October 21, 1– 4 p.m.
State Archives of North Carolina; 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh; First Floor Auditorium

Home Movie Day is an international celebration of amateur films designed to showcase home movies and other forms of amateur media, and to provide a forum to discuss best practices for film and digital media preservation. Hosted in the State Archives’ building auditorium, this annual event invites attendees to bring in their own films to screen and share with all. A/V Geeks Transfer Services will transfer film to digital formats (file to download or DVD) on-site for free. An archivist from the State Archives will provide film preservation tips for films, photographs, and digitized and born-digital documents. Bring in your family’s home movies (8mm, Super8mm, 16mm film, VHS and Video8/Hi8 video tapes) to share or just show up and watch the films of others and play Home Movie Day Bingo.

Virtual Family History Fair

Saturday, November 4, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Streaming online

Winding down the activities of Archives Month, the annual virtual Family History Fair, with its theme, “Start @Home,” focuses on practical tools used to research family history. Experts from the State Archives, the Government and Heritage Library, the N.C. Digital Heritage Center, and the State Historic Preservation Office will feature ways to search and use newspapers, government records, maps, directories, and digital collections to uncover community and family connections. Explore the genealogy of your own home in the “Genealogy of a House” session.

These sessions will stream online for free, so log on to your own laptop or desktop, or join a local participating public library for the presentations.

For details on streaming, a presentation agenda, and a list of participating libraries, see the online flyer. For additional information please email slnc.reference@ncdcr.gov or call (919) 807-7460.

Extended Research Hours

Friday, October 27, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

State Archives of North Carolina

Government and Heritage Library

109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, NC 27601

To accommodate those attending the N.C. Genealogical Society’s annual meeting on October 28, the State Archives Search Room and the Government and Heritage Library will extend their service hours for Friday, October 27. This is a rare opportunity to continue family research later into the evening.

October is Archives Month – A Celebration of Our Documents and History

 

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Archives Month is celebrated in archives and special libraries throughout the country. Governor Pat McCrory has proclaimed October Archives Month in North Carolina. During October the State Archives of North Carolina and many archives and libraries across the state will offer a variety of programs and outreach activities. The State Archives will present two free events Oct. 15 in celebration of archives, archivists, and records of our past.

Oct. 15 – Virtual Family History Fair

Since 2012, the State Archives and State Library have held workshops, presentations, exhibits and on-site genealogical consultations in Raleigh to celebrate the Family History Fair. For the first time, the 2016 Family History Fair will be a virtual event, with online streaming from the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences. Anyone can participate via laptop, notebook or smartphone. Discover how to access family records at the State Archives and how the State Library can help you begin your search. Experience these and other online live streaming presentations at home or at participating North Carolina libraries.

Consult the flyer and agenda for specific topics to be covered during the 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. program, and visitwww.ncdcr.gov/family-history to participate. For details on streaming and more information, please email slnc.reference@ncdcr.gov or call (919) 807-7460.

Oct. 15 – Home Movie Day

Bring a home movie to share with others and learn ways to care for your family’s collection of home films. This annual event in Raleigh is sponsored by the State Archives of North Carolina, AV Geeks, and the Film Studies Program at N.C. State University. If you don’t have any home movies of your own, come to enjoy the memories your neighbors bring. The Raleigh Home Movie Day will also feature Bingo with prizes for the whole family. Read more about Home Movie Day, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., at the Archives and History/State Library Building, 109 E. Jones St., Raleigh, N.C. 27601.

For additional information, please call (919) 807-7326.

Traveling Archivist Program Solicits Applications

APPLICATION DEADLINE: AUGUST 31, 2016

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 Does your institution need help with the preservation of and access to your collections?

If so, the State Archives is now soliciting applications for its Traveling Archivist Program (TAP).

TAP provides hands-on preservation assistance to cultural and heritage institutions that house archives, papers, and records at risk of deterioration, neglect, and damage. Institutions chosen to participate in this program will receive an onsite visit, a collections assessment, recommendations for managing and caring for the collections, training and instructions, and other resources including some basic preservation supplies.

The purpose of TAP is to help improve preservation of and access to collections that document the culture and history of our state.

The application is open to all North Carolina cultural and heritage institutions that house and maintain active historical collections, and whose collections are accessible to the public; however, federal agencies and those institutions housing solely objects or artifacts are ineligible for this program.

Since its beginnings in 2009, TAP has served more than 100 repositories in 54 counties.

Click on the application and guidelines. Questions relating to the application process may be addressed to Andrea Gabriel, North Carolina State Archives, 919-807-7326, andrea.gabriel@ncdcr.gov, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.