Author Archives: Chris

NC Supreme Court microfilm series update

The Imaging Unit of the State Archives of North Carolina has just completed imaging and creating microfilm for the Fall 1966 term of the Supreme Court of North Carolina. The sixty-one new reels of microfilm have been added to the security vault and a reading copy is available for public use – just ask at the main reference desk and reference staff will assist you.

Microfilm reel call numbers S.110.2158 to S.110.2218 cover case files 1 through 837.

To use microfilm at the State Archives of North Carolina please come to the main registration desk. Once registered, a Reference Archivist can assist you in locating and using the microfilm.

To order duplicate reels of microfilm in Diazo, Silver Halide, or digital format contact Chris Meekins at chris.meekins@ncdcr.gov.

The modern North Carolina Supreme Court records (case files and opinions) are being microfilmed for preservation purposes by the Imaging Unit. As more records are imaged, updates will be posted. The Imaging Unit hopes that researchers will find these projects useful.

Completion of “The Mount Olive Tribune” project

The Imaging Unit of the State Archives of North Carolina has completed a microfilming project of the regional newspaper The Mount Olive Tribune.  A total of 128 reels of microfilm were created from the original newspaper.  The microfilm includes scattered issues starting in 1906 with a more complete run after that year and ending with the year 2014; there were no extant issues for 1921 at the time of filming.  Most of the reels are available to researchers in the microfilm reading room [through 1962] but, due to space limitations, not all 128 reels are in the reading room. However, all 128 reels are available for duplication from the State Archives.

For duplication contact Chris Meekins – chris.meekins <@> ncdcr.gov.

JUNETEENTH IN NORTH CAROLINA: SEARCH ROOM EXHIBIT AND RELATED RESOURCES

by Alex Dowrey

This month, the exhibit case in our search room features records related to emancipation and Juneteenth celebrations in North Carolina. Juneteenth commemorates the emancipation of Texas slaves on June 19, 1865 when Union General Gordon Granger arrived to occupy Galveston, Texas and issued General Order Number Three. This occurred almost two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and is “considered the date when the last enslaved Americans were notified of their new legal status” as free Americans.[1] Although Juneteenth started as a Texas holiday, the celebration spread to other states including North Carolina.

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Cumberland County Tax Records

The Imaging Unit of the State Archives of North Carolina has just completed imaging and creating microfilm for some Cumberland County tax records. The one new reel of microfilm has been added to the security vault.

The material includes [reel number and year]:
C.029.70045 1948, 1950, 1951 Tax scrolls

To use microfilm please come to the main registration desk at the State Archives. Once registered, a Reference Archivist can assist you in locating and using microfilm.

To order duplicate reels of microfilm in Diazo, Silver Halide, or digital format contact Chris Meekins at chris.meekins@ncdcr.gov.

The Imaging Unit is in the middle of a small project for tax records. As we complete more imaging projects, we will post the completed projects information. We, in the Imaging Unit, hope that you, the researcher, will find these projects useful.

Eyewitness to Barnum’s show

CH TubbsPvt. Charles Henry Tubbs served in the 27th Massachusetts volunteers during the first years of the Civil War and in 1863, due to a lingering illness, was transferred to the Invalid Corps – a group of men who were not healthy enough for combat duty but were well enough for garrison duty.  Tubbs’ first service was in North Carolina, where he spent a little more than a year between 1862 and 1863.  After the riots in New York City in the summer of 1863, the Invalid Corps was stationed in New York City to keep the peace.  Tubbs wrote letters to his wife Minerva (Nerve, as he called her) in Massachusetts from his post in Brooklyn.  Tubbs transferred one last time from Brooklyn to Washington DC as the Invalid Corps was moved to help guard the Nation’s Capital after the Confederate raid in the summer of 1864.

While in Brooklyn, Tubbs visited P.T. Barnum’s show and sent a detailed description home to Nerve.  His letter gives an interesting view of the show as seen by someone who was contemporary to the event. His account is even more interesting due to the recent success of the current movie about Barnum’s show.

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Friday Find – Some Old Miscellaneous Microfilm

Today’s Friday Find involves some microfilm that has been with the State Archives a long time but is now residing in a new location within the Archives system.

This is microfilm that was originally imaged by the Mormon church in the 1930’s and 1940’s.  The material was still in the county office at time of imaging.  It could be early examples of records that the State Archives has in the county collections (the deeds, for example), it could be items that may or may not have been transferred to the State Archives (the Chowan court papers, for example) or it may be something that the State Archives does not otherwise have on microfilm (the Rowan County administrator bonds for example).

A card catalog card has been placed with the miscellaneous collection cards and a cross reference catalog card has been placed in the county materials.  Researchers may come across the old reference number when researching in published works – those reference numbers are retained on the box labels to assist future researchers in finding the same information as cited by a previous researcher.

Z.1.71.1 Duplin County Deeds, Books 1, 2; 1754-1768

Z.1.71.2 Duplin County Deeds, Books 3, 4; 1757-1772

Z.1.71.3 Duplin County Deeds, Books 5-7; 1775-1783

Z.1.71.4 Duplin County Deeds, Book 8; 1783-1792

Z.1.71.5 Duplin County Deed Index, Grantors and Grantees, 1779-1850

Z.1.71.6 Duplin County Division of Land, Book A, 1800-1860

Z.1.71.7 Duplin County, Inventories and Accounts of Estates, 1754-1800 part 1

Z.1.71.8 Duplin County, Inventories and Accounts of Estates, 1754-1800 part 2

Z.1.71.9 Duplin County, Inventories and Accounts of Estates, 1754-1800 part 3

Z.1.72    Rowan County, Administrators Bonds, 1823-1830

Z.1.73    Chowan County, Orders of the Court, 1780-1830, one volume

Microfilm is self-service but, as always, you can ask the Reference staff for assistance in finding records, loading microfilm, and getting a copy of the single record or the whole reel.

Friday Finds – The Great War in county records

This Friday we bring you another find from the microfilm collection.

The Department of Natural and Cultural Resources has been highlighting World War One (WWI), also known as The Great War, in 2017.  Two interesting county microfilm reels contain information related to WWI.

In the Columbus County miscellaneous series, we have a unique offering entitled “History of World War Veterans.”  This is a roster of men and women from Columbus County who served in the war – in the armed services or the Red Cross, etc.  The people are listed and their services records are briefly covered.  Often a military unit’s or Red Cross chapter’s activities will be discussed.  Many small vignettes are intermixed with the rosters and cover home front and war records.  One such piece is entitled “Red Cross in Whiteville in the Great War.”  The entire book as imaged on the microfilm is only 85 pages but it is full of descriptive items related to the people of the county during the war.  This reel is C.027.90005.

In the Davie County estate series, we have an item recorded as World War Guardians, 1937-1958.  At first glance it may seem the dates are for the second World War but the law that created the record series dates from 1929.  Chapter 33 of NC Public Laws is titled “an act regulating the guardianship of incompetent veterans and of minor children of disabled or deceased veterans and the commitment of veterans to US hospitals.”  This law allowed for assistance to veterans and their minor children.  The date of the law suggests it was related to the first World War.  This is even smaller than the reel above – only a fifteen-page book that was microfilmed.  Some of the pages included a multi-page document attached so that there are several frames to capture each of those pages.  If your veteran or his minor children received help they might be listed.  It seems likely that other counties had these records but did not separate them from other guardian books – I can find no similar World War Guardian only books in other counties in the microfilm collection.  If not your family history maybe this reel could lead you to exploring the law and how effective it was in North Carolina – or some other social history question.  Or maybe you can look at the guardian files in other counties to see if this law was used but not kept as a separate record series.  This reel is C.033.50018.

To place an order for a duplicate copy of the material mentioned in the blog post please contact Chris Meekins, Imaging Unit Head  –  chris.meekins <at> ncdcr.gov or reach him by phone at 919.807.7333.

 Friday Finds wants you!  Have you used microfilm at the State Archives of North Carolina?  Did you make a research connection – a find – using microfilm? Would you like to share your find with the State Archives for possible inclusion in this blog?  If you answered yes to all of these please send an email to Chris Meekins at the above email address.  Tell me 1) who you are, 2) what you found (like a will connecting generations or a deed naming a missing spouse, etc.), 3) what the record name and call number are,  4) and why it was “a find” (how it helped your research – be it genealogical or historical research).  Who knows – yours might be the next Friday Find in our blog…