Monthly Archives: September 2017

State Archives Collection Documents Military Service of Col. Richard Hunt

Photo of Col. Richard Hunt in an airplane
[This blog post comes from a Dept. of Natural and Cultural Resources press release – you can find other press releases here.]

The State Archives of North Carolina is excited to announce the availability for research of a new, rare collection documenting the distinguished U.S. Marine Corps career of Col. Richard M. Hunt, who served in WWII, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War with high distinction.

The Richard M. Hunt Papers are housed in the Military Collection at the State Archives, and are freely accessible for research in the public Search Room at the Archives. Colonel Hunt’s photographs are available for viewing online through the State Archives’ Flickr page.

“The Hunt Papers contain some of the rarest correspondence from the Vietnam War belonging to a Marine Corps commanding officer in the country,” says Matthew Peek, Military Collection archivist at the State Archives. “We hope to use the materials in the collection to add to the dialogue on the role of the Vietnam War in our country’s cultural memory and its lingering effects on those who served in our military.”

Photo of Richard HuntIn January 1940, Richard Hunt moved to Raleigh, N.C., from Maryland and began work as a reporter for the Raleigh News and Observer and the Associated Press (AP), working under the byline “Dick Hunt.” Hunt stayed with the AP until May 27, 1942, when he chose to enlist in and train in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves in North Carolina.

Richard Hunt served in WWII from 1942 to 1945 as a Marine Corps pilot, including with the Air Liaison Unit, Headquarters, 1st Marine Division, in the Pacific Theater. Hunt also served during the Korean War as a Marine Corps pilot from 1953 to 1954.

Hunt’s most distinguished military service was his time as the commanding officer of the Marine Aircraft Group 16 (MAG-16), 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, from March 1966 to October 1966 in Vietnam during the Vietnam War. Mostly a Marine Corps helicopter unit based out of the Marble Mountain Air Facility in Vietnam, Colonel Hunt held tactical command of Task Force Delta, including fixed-wing and helicopter support, during Operation Hastings against the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces in the summer of 1966. Operation Hastings was the largest combined U.S. military operation of the Vietnam War to that time. He also was involved in numerous missions with the South Vietnamese forces in 1966.

Photo of Col. Richard HuntAfter his Vietnam War service, Richard Hunt would be named as the military aide to U.S. Vice-President Hubert H. Humphrey, serving from 1967 to January 1969. In this capacity, Hunt liaised between the vice president, cabinet members and their representatives, foreign government representatives, and other important government officials. Hunt assisted in keeping Humphrey fully informed and advised in sensitive military matters of the United States’ international involvements. Hunt advised the vice president on the United States’ expanding involvement in the Vietnam War, and issues such as underground nuclear testing in Nevada in 1968. Following his death in 2007, Colonel Hunt was buried with honors in Arlington National Cemetery.

The Hunt collection at the State Archives contains over 800 letters from Hunt to his wife during the Korean and Vietnam Wars, numerous photographs of Vietnam War combat and activities, Hunt’s original Marine Corps pilot flight logs from 1942 to 1967, and original Vietnam War U.S. State Department briefing books on the Vietnam War.

The most important materials in the collection are Hunt’s more than 350 letters from 1966 to 1967, with details about his unit’s combat activities and losses, his perspectives on the war, and opposition attitudes to American forces in Vietnam during the Vietnam War. The letters offer unprecedented levels of mission details on important 1966 operations, such as Operation Hastings, Operation Kansas, Operation Colorado, and Operation Prairie.

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New Veterans Oral History Collection Online

[This blog post was written by Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

1st Lt. Bennis M. Blue (third from right) pictured during parachute jump training for the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, N.C., in 1978. Blue was the first female officer of the 82nd Airborne. From the Bennis M. Blue Papers, Cold War Papers, Military Collection.

1st Lt. Bennis M. Blue (third from right) pictured during parachute jump training for the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, N.C., in 1978. Blue was the first female officer of the 82nd Airborne. From the Bennis M. Blue Papers, Cold War Papers, Military Collection.

The Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina is excited to announce the launch of the digital Veterans Oral History Collection through the North Carolina Digital Collections. The interviews, conducted since 2015 as audio interviews, are part of the Military Collection’s North Carolina Veterans Oral History Program, whose goal is to capture and provide access to the memories and experiences of the military servicemen and servicewomen from North Carolina, preserving them for the future scholarship. The collection is comprised of more than 1,100 oral history interviews, the majority of which are in analog formats and scheduled for future digitization. These initial 25 interviews—all conducted with state-of-the-art digital audio recorders used by the State Archives—document veterans from World War II to the Iraq War, as well as individuals serving during peacetime.

The interviews include: a U.S. Army helicopter crew chief who flew missions in Cambodia during the Vietnam War; women who served during the integration of the Women’s Army Corps into the regular Army in 1978; a U.S. Air Force Russian language specialist conducting radio communications surveillance by aircraft of Soviet Union radio communications from the northern Arctic coast of Russia during the 1970s; and a woman whose family farm was taken under eminent domain for the creation of Camp Butner in 1942. There are also interviews with Vietnam War intelligence officers, U.S. Air Force communications specialists during the era around the September 11th attacks and the early days of the Iraq War, and a U.S. Army Air Force as a tail gunner with the 14th Air Force in China during WWII.

Additional interviews will be added as they are conducted in the coming years. The audio is available for streaming only through the Internet Archive, linked through pages on the North Carolina Digital Collections. In the future, interview summaries with subjects and time dates will be uploaded, to increase access to the interviews. Digital copies of the interviews can be ordered through the State Archives’ Reference Unit under the duplication services for audiovisual materials.

 

Constitution Day Event at Historic Henderson County Courthouse

North Carolina's copy of the Bill of Rights, 1789

North Carolina’s copy of the Bill of Rights, 1789. Part of the Vault Collection. Available online at http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p15012coll11/id/29.

In honor of Constitution Day, the State Archives of North Carolina is presenting public programs at the Historic Henderson County Courthouse on September 18, 2017.  The program will be given at 9 AM, 10:30 AM, and 1 PM.  It will feature the odyssey of North Carolina’s original copy of the Bill of Rights from North Carolina’s role in the development of the document through its theft after the Civil War and recovery almost 140 years later.

The historic courthouse is located at 1 Historic Courthouse Square on Main Street in Hendersonville.

The event is free and open to the public.

“What Does That Say?” Series, Pt. III

Deciphering the Handwritten Records of Early America

Since beginning my work with digitizing the General Assembly Session Records collection at the State Archives, I have had to do a bit of research on how to effectively interpret 18th century manuscripts in order create the appropriate metadata for the records and improve discoverability of these records in our digital collection. The following sections include a brief history of writing during this time period, characteristics of 17th and 18th century British-American handwriting, and some tips on deciphering the text found within these records.

This is the third blog post of a series on how to read handwritten colonial documents, see the first blog post of this series on abbreviations, shorthand, and lettering, and the second post of this series on writing styles.

Continue reading

Labor Day Holiday

"Sawyer, Thomas 1771,” from the District Superior Court Records, one of the new collections being added to the NC Digital Collections.

“Sawyer, Thomas 1771,” from the District Superior Court Records, one of the new collections being added to the NC Digital Collections.

The State Archives of North Carolina will be closed Sept. 2-4, 2017 for the Labor Day holiday. However, our online catalog and digital collections are available to you any time. Over the last few months we’ve added several new collections to the North Carolina Digital Collections, so watch for upcoming blog posts about those materials.

In other news, if you don’t follow our records management blog you may have missed these posts:

And our audio visual and military archivists have loaded new photographs into Flickr, such as:

Photograph of Lawrence E. Allen (center) and two unidentified African American shipmates in Sweden

Photograph of Lawrence E. Allen (center) and two unidentified African American shipmates in Sweden. (Call number: CLDW 23.F3.13)