Family Traditions of Service: Dedication of the Coast Guard Air Station, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Event Program

[This blog post was written by Matthew Peek, Military Collection Archivist for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

Dedication of the Coast Guard Air Station, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Event Program, Date: October 17, 1940

Dedication of the Coast Guard Air Station, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Event Program, Date: October 17, 1940

Coastal North Carolina suffered from fears of and attacks by German submarines during World War II. On October 17, 1940, a major U.S. Coast Guard Air Station base was established at Elizabeth City, North Carolina, to work with personnel from the Coast Guard’s shore stations to rescue crews of tankers and freighters sunk by submarines.

This is the cover from the original dedication event program for that air station, which today comprises 800 acres in Elizabeth City. This rare document is the genesis of the Coast Guard Air Station, which is the largest and busiest Coast Guard air station in the United States.

To learn more about the Coast Guard’s operations during WWII in North Carolina, check out the WWII Papers in the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina.

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This blog post is one in two-week series of posts sharing the items used in the exhibit titled “The Family Traditions of Service:  A Historical Tribute to Veterans.” This exhibit, on display from November 3 to November 13, 2015, at the Dare County Arts Council building in Manteo, N.C., is sponsored by the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center, the exhibit serves as a historical tribute to over 100 years of military service of North Carolina residents and their families, with particular emphasis on coastal North Carolina. The goal of the exhibit is to honor the role of North Carolina veterans and their families during peacetime and war. The items from this exhibit come from the holdings of the Military Collection at the State Archives of North Carolina and the Outer Banks History Center.

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