“Dare County in the 1930s: Decade of Determination” Exhibit to Debut This Friday at the Outer Banks History Center

[This blog post comes from the Outer Banks History Center.*]

This Friday evening, the Outer Banks History Center rolls out the welcome mat to one and all for the debut of a new exhibit, Dare County in the 1930s: Decade of Determination. The opening reception, this Friday evening, March 1, from 5:30-7:30 p.m., is hosted by the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center.  The event is free and open to the public.  No R.S.V.P. required.

Sarah Downing and volunteer Shea Foreman  mounting panels for the center’s upcoming exhibit

Outer Banks History Center assistant curator Sarah Downing and volunteer Shea Foreman are hard at work mounting panels for the center’s upcoming exhibit, Dare County in the 1930s: Decade of Determination.

Despite the Great Depression, the 1930s were times of great change in Dare County, N.C. when a new course was set for the future that would bring the region into national prominence.  From the opening of the Wright Memorial Bridge and Wright Brothers National Memorial that led to the first paved roads to the birth of outdoor symphonic drama with the debut of Paul Green’s The Lost Colony, the region embraced its history and unique culture in an unprecedented way.  The impact was felt by local residents as the world became more accessible to them and the region became a vacation haven for visitors from afar.  Fishing and living off the land gave way to tourism as the primary means of making a living.  All this happened in the midst of an influx of federal funds for “New Deal” projects, notable among them being the building of an ocean-front dune system by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration that literally changed the landscape.

Dare County in the 1930s: Decade of Determination will be on display through – October 15.  In addition to static displays, a video of President Roosevelt’s 1937 trip to Dare County to witness The Lost Colony play in its first season tops off the exhibit with oral histories and period news reels, narrated and produced by Dare County’s own Ken Mann, Coastal Productions Inc., producer of the perennial television favorite, My Heart Will Always Be In Carolina.

The exhibit is made possible through generous support from the Friends of the Outer Banks History Center and Outer Banks Community Foundation’s Frank Stick Memorial Fund.  The Outer Banks History Center is a regional archives and research library of the State Archives of North Carolina, Department of Cultural Resources.  For more information call (252) 473-2655, e-mail obhc@ncdcr.gov, visit www.obhistorycenter.ncdcr.gov and/or follow us on Facebook and Flickr.

[*Edited 02/27/2013 to add: post was written by KaeLi Schurr]

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