OBHC Finding Aids for Civil War Manuscripts and Letters

There are two new finding aids on the Outer Banks History Center (OBHC) website:

Civil War Era Manuscripts, 1861 – 1863 – North Carolina’s Outer Banks was the setting for two important Civil War conflicts. Union victories at Hatteras Island and Roanoke Island early in the war placed the area under Federal control and extended their blockade to the Southern Coast. The Civil War Manuscripts collection contains a Confederate requisition, a receipt, and an accompanying pass issued to soldiers. (3 items)

Civil War Letters, 1861 – 1864 – North Carolina’s Outer Banks was the setting for two important Civil War engagements. Union victories at Hatteras Inlet and Roanoke Island early in the war placed the area under Federal control and extended their blockade to the Southern Coast. This collection contains a group of letters written by soldiers during the Civil War. Topics discussed in the letters include: Fort Hatteras, the Fort Hatteras garrison flag, Camp Raleigh, Camp Brightwood, provost duty, the Burnside Expedition, the victory at Roanoke Island, and army food rations. Transcripts of all letters are included. (.19 cubic feet)

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2 thoughts on “OBHC Finding Aids for Civil War Manuscripts and Letters

  1. Laddie Crisp

    Dear Sarah,

    Hi, I’m Laddie Crisp, the guy who makes Spherical Panoramas from the tops of lighthouses. I understand that are putting together an exhibit on Bodie Island Lighthouse soon. My understanding from Cheryl is that you have viewed an spherical panoramic image of Bodie LH from the lantern room. I know nothing of your plans for the exhibit. I’m biased, but I feel a spherical panoramic has much to offer when thinking what it is like from the top of the lighthouse. The view is the same view that was seen by the lighthouse keeper over 100 years ago. I have always championed the idea that a spherical panoramic should be in the museum that is often found at the base of the lighthouse.. As you know most folks are never allowed the view from the lantern room but only a voew from the gallery which is lower. Also remember that the very young, the old, infirmed and those with disabilities will never get to see the view at the top.

    Spherical panoramics are better viewed on big monitors, and best on double monitor setups. The bigger the better! I don’t have an extra computer/monitor and I’m still working with a 19 inch monitor at home. I often view my final high resolution images on double screen/monitor setups at my hospital. These are often used for viewing of x-rays. Again, bigger is better! If had an extra setup I would certainly lend it to the center for the exhibit. The computer does not have to be very powerful. All you need is a computer with monitor and internet browser. The computer does not have to be on the internet. The image will be resident on the hard drive of the computer and it uses the browser to display the image. My “crappie website” displays medium resolution images. High resolution images look better.

    I am not trying to convince you to using my panorama. I’m just letting your know if desired, call me and I can help.

    Sincerely, Laddie Crisp

    http://pages.suddenlink.net/laddad

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