Monthly Archives: April 2010

Manteo Rotary Club Records Finding Aid

There is a new finding aid on the Outer Banks History Center website:

Manteo Rotary Club Records, 1937 – 1997
Rotary International is an organization with local chapters whose stated purpose is to “bring together business and professional leaders to provide humanitarian service, encourage high ethical standards in all vocations, and help build goodwill and peace in the world.” The Manteo Rotary Club was chartered in 1936 and is in district 7720. This collection consists of correspondence, club records, and membership information. The collection covers 1937-1997, however there is a gap from 1951-1976. The materials in the original donation cover 1937-1951; the materials in the second donation cover 1976-1997. These papers belonged to Wally McCown and include McCown’s correspondence, newsletters, district information, and club activities. (1.20 cubic feet)

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Dredge and Fill Requests Near Whalebone Junction

There is a new finding aid on the Outer Banks History Center website:

Collection of Dredge and Fill Requests Near Whalebone Junction, 1973 – 1974 – In 1974, two separate permits were issued to dredge and fill portions of Roanoke Sound near Whalebone Junction. One was obtained by J. W. Korback, Jr., who wanted to dredge and fill for a fish hatchery. The second permit was issued to Causeway Properties, to dredge and fill for commercial or residential purposes. This collection contains materials that relate to these requests to dredge and fill Roanoke Sound in 1974. It contains correspondence, permits, and drawings of the area to be dredged. (16 items)

News from the Historical Publications Section

[Our blog post today comes from the Historical Publications Section, one of our sister organizations within the North Carolina Office of Archives and History.]

Native Carolinians: The Indians of North Carolina by Theda Perdue and Christopher Arris Oakley

The Historical Publications Section announces the publication of a new, revised edition of Native Carolinians: The Indians of North Carolina, by Theda Perdue and Christopher Arris Oakley.

First published in 1985 and reprinted five times over the next quarter century, Native Carolinians is one of the section’s most popular titles. For this new edition, Dr. Perdue selected Dr. Christopher Arris Oakley, associate professor of history at East Carolina University, to revise her original study. The chapters on the Cherokees, the Lumbees, and Native Carolinians today have been expanded to include important developments in these topics since 1985. A number of new illustrations have been added, and a detailed index now makes the text more accessible.

Native Carolinians: The Indians of North Carolina (paperbound; pp. xiii, 101; illustrations; index; 2010) sells for $19.40, which includes shipping and tax. Order from the Historical Publications Section (B), Office of Archives and History, 4622 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-4622. For credit card orders call (919) 733-7442, ext. 0, or visit the section’s secure online store at http://nc-historical-publications.stores.yahoo.net/. Native Carolinians is also available through local bookstores and Amazon.com.

Guide to County Records in the North Carolina State Archives

Recent titles published by Historical Publications include the following:

Guide to County Records in the North Carolina State Archives, contains an exhaustive list of all of the original and microfilmed records for each North Carolina county that are housed in the State Archives as of March 1, 2009. This new edition, the first since 1997, describes more than 13,000 bound volumes, 22,000 boxes of loose records, and 24,000 reels of microfilm.

Haven on the Hill: The History of North Carolina’s Dorothea Dix Hospital, by Marjorie O’Rorke, presents the story of Raleigh’s Dorothea Dix Hospital from the events surrounding the 1848 legislative authorization to fund and build the state’s first mental hospital to the ongoing debate over the property’s future following the proposed closing of the hospital in the early 21st century. This compelling narrative includes the personal stories of those who served the patients and thoughtful analysis of the trends and developments that shaped the hospital as an institution over more than a century. To order these new titles, please visit or call (919) 733-7442, ext. 0. Prices include tax and shipping.

Haven on the Hill: The History of North Carolina’s Dorothea Dix Hospital by Marjorie O’Rorke

Each of these books sells for $28.02, which includes shipping and tax. Order from the Historical Publications Section (B), Office of Archives and History, 4622 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-4622. For credit card orders call (919) 733-7442, ext. 0, or visit the section’s secure online store. These books are also available through local bookstores and Amazon.com.

The Historical Publications Section has been your source for affordable North Carolina history since 1903.

Dreier Finding Aids and BMC

Updated versions of the Theodore and Barbara Loines Dreier Black Mountain College Collection finding aids are now available online, including an expanded finding aid for the series “Dreier Family and Black Mountain College Related Photographs and Negatives.” Both Theodore and Barbara Loines Dreier helped to found Black Mountain College (BMC) and remained an important part of the BMC community until they left the college in 1949.

Lake Eden, former campus for Black Mountain College, April 20, 2002

Lake Eden, former campus for Black Mountain College, April 20, 2002

If you aren’t aware of Black Mountain College, it was an experimental school located in Black Mountain, North Carolina. The college was established in 1933 by John A. Rice and others, many of whom were former students and faculty from Rollins College in Florida. The purpose of the college was to educate the whole person, with an emphasis on the role of the arts and creative thinking. Black Mountain College itself was owned by the faculty, with students playing a significant role in the decision-making process. Although grades were kept for transfer purposes, they were not used to evaluate a student’s progress.

Both faculty and students participated in the work program, which included the daily chores necessary for the upkeep of the school at the Blue Ridge campus. Later, the college purchased land nearby and the work program was expanded to include the construction of college buildings and the maintenance of an inn and farm on the Lake Eden property.

Josef Albers' drawing class ca. 1939-40 from the BMC Research Project, Visual Materials

Josef Albers' drawing class ca. 1939-40 from the BMC Research Project, Visual Materials

Despite the fact that Black Mountain College could rarely offer faculty more than room and board, a number of important teachers and artists were drawn to the school as part of the regular faculty or to participate in the school’s Summer Institutes. Josef and Anni Albers, John Cage, Robert Creeley, Merce Cunningham, Max Dehn, Joseph Fiore, Buckminister Fuller, Edward Lowinsky, Robert Motherwell, Charles Olson, M.C. Richards, and Xanti Schawinsky were only a few of those who taught at Black Mountain College. In addition, the success of several of the college’s students (such as Ruth Asawa, Edward Dorn, Kenneth Noland, and Robert Rauschenberg) helped to further the college’s reputation in the area of the arts and the avant-garde.

The character and focus of Black Mountain College shifted over time, according to the make-up of the faculty and students. Personal and ideological conflicts were common and sometimes led to major changes in the college community. One such conflict was the topic of integration. Despite the concerns of some staff about possible negative reactions from the community towards the college, Black Mountain College had both African-American students and teachers in the 1940s. Lack of funds added to the stress of the situation at BMC, as did the school’s physical isolation.  Eventually student enrollment and available funds dwindled until the college was forced to close in 1956.

Miriam “Mimi” French, BMC student 1939-1944 from the Black Mountain College Records

Miriam “Mimi” French, BMC student 1939-1944 from the Black Mountain College Records, Photographs, Folder 122.1

We have quite a few collections that relate to BMC, including the official college records which can be searched in our online catalog, MARS. In fact, the North Carolina State Archives is the repository for the records of a significant number of defunct colleges in North Carolina. A full listing of Black Mountain College related collections can be found on our website and you can also read scanned copies of selected BMC publications, which present a glimpse into daily life at this unique institution.

Social Media in the News – Guidelines for State and Local Government

Social media has been in the news quite a bit lately with the announcement that Twitter will give its archive of all public messages (or “tweets” in Twitter parlance) to the Library of Congress. If you want to know more about the transfer of the Twitter archive, the blog ArchivesNext has a list of relevant links including a blog post by the Archivist of the United States, David Ferriero, explaining the differences between the National Archives and the Library of Congress and why Twitter would fit into the collection policy of one institution but not the other.  In addition, the GovTwit blog has an interesting post on the possible records schedule implications of the Library of Congress maintaining the Twitter archive and UNC-Chapel Hill School of Information and Library Science doctoral student Fred Stutzman has a post dealing with privacy in social software.

All of the Twitter at the Library of Congress discussion is an excellent introduction to the actual point of this blog post – the announcement that there are two new social media guidelines available on the Government Records Branch website: Best Practices for Local Government Social Media Usage in North Carolina (PDF) and Best Practices for State Agency Social Media Usage in North Carolina (PDF). These guidelines are in addition to the existing guidelinesBest Practices for Social Media Usage in North Carolina (PDF), and the online tutorial Social Networking Websites for State Agencies.

Flickr Updates and a new State Government Web Archives Site

Our Non-Textual Materials Archivist, Kim Cumber, has recently added new sets of photographs to our Flickr account including photos of 1980s Raleigh night life, the Chatham County Courthouse, and the Raleigh sit-ins of 1960. I’ve also added a social media section to the Online Projects page on the State Archives web site; currently the section includes links to Flickr and this blog, but I will be adding other social media links there as they become available.

In other news, the North Carolina State Government Web Site Archives has a new web address: http://webarchives.ncdcr.gov/. The staff in the Government Records Branch and the State Library’s Digital Information Management Program (DIMP) have redesigned the site to make it easier to search. If you are unfamiliar with the Web Site Archives (WSA), it is a site that allows you to search versions of North Carolina state government web sites dating back to 1996. For more information about what web sites have been archived and how they were harvested, visit the WSA About page.

Drs. Frank Gates and W. W. Johnston Ledgers and Daybooks

There is a new finding aid on the Outer Banks History Center website:

Drs. Frank Gates and W. W. Johnston Ledgers and Daybooks, 1891 – 1928
Dr. Franklin P. Gates (1859-1922), a native of Kinston, North Carolina established a practice in Manteo after graduating from Bellevue Hospital Medical College in 1886. He was the town doctor until shortly after World War I. Dr. Wiley Warren Johnston (1885-1978), a native of Brinkleyville, North Carolina, moved to Manteo in 1914 directly out of medical school and joined Gates’ practice. Johnston was called into service in the U. S. Army Medical Corps during World War I, but returned to Manteo and resumed his practice with Gates. After Johnston’s return, Gates began a practice in Norfolk, Virginia. Dr. Johnston practiced medicine in Dare County for over 40 years and was director of health departments in Dare, Currituck, and Hyde Counties for 25 years. This collection consists of daybooks and ledgers of Drs. Gates and Johnston. The books contain the day by day account of patients seen and medicines prescribed, charges rendered and bills paid. Also included in the collection are several pieces of correspondence, two prescriptions, several clippings from Time magazine, as well as serials on the production and handling of milk. (20 items)