This Monday, August 31st, 2015, marks the centennial anniversary of The Raleigh Times “Newsboys” photograph held by the State Archives of North Carolina. To commemorate this milestone, the State Archives has planned an exhibit and an afternoon of events hosted by the Raleigh Times Restaurant and Bar, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m, August 31st. The facade in the photograph, taken by Albert Barden on August 31st, 1915, may look familiar to those who frequent downtown Raleigh because the one-time newspaper offices located at 14 E. Hargett Street have housed the Raleigh Times Restaurant since 2006.

Schedule of Events:

11 a.m. – The exhibit opens to the public at the Raleigh Times Restaurant and Bar, 14 E. Hargett St., Raleigh. The original 8″ x 10″ glass plate negative of the “Newsboys” photograph will be on display all afternoon.

11 a.m. – 1 p.m. – Have your picture taken outside with a life-sized “paperboys” cutout!

3 p.m. – Children’s story time, The Paperboy, by Dav Pilkey, with a representative from the State Library of North Carolina. Free giveaways of NCpedia stickers and coloring pages, as well as Times Boys bobble head dolls and storybooks.

5 p.m. – “Special” keg tapping and free giveaways of Raleigh Times t-shirts, gift cards, and Times Boys bobble heads.

Throughout the event, Archivists from the State Archives of North Carolina will be available to answer questions about the Archives’ photograph and other collections. Also, representatives from the Friends of the Archives will be on hand to distribute information about the SANC and the upcoming exhibit, The Treasures of Carolina …Stories from the State Archives, at the North Carolina Museum of History. Donations to help fund this historic and exciting exhibit will be gratefully accepted!

For more information on the State Archives of North Carolina or the State Library of North Carolina, please visit our websites!

Posted by: Kat | August 25, 2015

Summer of the Archives

Have you ever scrolled through the many items in the North Carolina Digital Collections and discovered a hidden treasure? Each week this summer we will highlight an item from our collection in the hopes of inspiring you to discover new-to-you materials in our digital collections.

Cucumber Harvester, Grants #41 and #109 (Call no.: Econ. Devel. RG. Sci. & Tech. Devel. Section, Sci. & Tech. Research Cntr.: Photo File)

Cucumber Harvester, Grants #41 and #109 (Call no.: Econ. Devel. RG. Sci. & Tech. Devel. Section, Sci. & Tech. Research Cntr.: Photo File)

For those of us who like to eat our vegetables, summertime means delicious, fresh produce! And North Carolina, with its abundant farmland, is a fine place to be! This image, from our brand new Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Digital Collection, is one of several photos that show how old agricultural practices can be improved upon with technology to produce greater yields with less labor. The cucumber harvester in this photograph was developed between 1964 and 1966 by the North Carolina Pickle Producers Association and the N.C. State Agricultural Engineering Department with a grant from the North Carolina Board of Science and Technology, and then manufactured by the Aeroglide Corporation of Raleigh in 1967. Peter J. Chenery, then Director of the N.C. Board of Science and Technology, describes the project on pages 4-6 of a speech he presented on September 19, 1968, at the Conference on Science, Technology, and State Government:

“The difficult problem which had to be solved with this machine was due to the fact that all of the cucumbers don’t ripen at the same time. In order to harvest the full crop, it is necessary to go back to the field four, five, or six times at intervals of several days to pick cucumbers as they mature and reach the proper size. Thus the machine cannot pull up the cucumber vines but must leave them in place. As you see, the machine has passed over the row, harvested most of the ripe cucumbers and left the vines growing to be harvested again…

“The Comparison between machine harvesting and manual picking indicates that one mechanical harvester… will do the work of between 20 and 25 men picking by hand.”

For more information on Agriculture in North Carolina check, out this list of articles at NCpedia.

For more information on Science, Technology, and Innovations in North Carolina, check out this list of articles at NCpedia.

A Bill to establish and incorporate a company for the purpose of cutting a navigable canal from Clubfoot Creek to Harlowe Creek and to repeal all acts heretofore passed relative thereto.

(Call no. GASR Nov 1795-Dec 1795, Box 1)

From the early days of its statehood to the modern era, North Carolina has been a hub for agricultural, industrial, technological, and ecological innovation in the southeastern United States.The curiosity, dedication, and inventive spirit of North Carolinians can be observed in the records left behind by farmers, industrialists, engineers, research scientists, inventors, educators, and statesmen. The Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Digital Collection, part of North Carolina Digital Collections, is an attempt to highlight a representative sample of the holdings of the State Archives of North Carolina related to the STEM fields.

Sanitary Survey: Salisbury Waterworks

(Call no. Health Srvc. RG. Health Srvc. Lab. Section: Sanitary (Engineering) Survey Files)

The STEM Digital Collection at NCDC is not meant to be exhaustive, but by making a portion of this material available, we hope to broaden the perception of the kinds of materials held in archives, and to spark greater interest in the use of primary sources for studying the history of science and technology.

These records provide users with a view not only of how scientific practices, research methods, and theories change over time, but also the complications involved with experimentation and modernization. Additionally, these records demonstrate the interplay between science and society, particularly with respect to agriculture, public works projects, public health campaigns, and economic development.

Rural Electrification Survey Report by W. McC. Neale

(Call no. Rural Electrification Authority RG, Letters and Info. — 1934 Survey)

To create this digital collection, we have drawn material from over 50 records series and collections held by the State Archives of North Carolina including: State Agency Records, Private Collections, Photograph Collections, Organization Records, General Assembly Records, and Map Collections.

North Carolina Sanitary District Chart for Hookworm Disease

(Call no. Health Srvc. RG., Health Srvc. Lab. Section: Hookworm Disease Survey and

The first of three installments of the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Digital Collection is now available, and includes items from the following records collections:

  • Agricultural Society of North Carolina Paper (Call no.: ORG.2)
  • Agriculture Record Group. Entomology Division: Correspondence and Reports (MARS Id: 7.26 (Series)
  • Board of Science and Technology Record Group. Scientific Equipment File (MARS Id: 124.2 (Series))
  • Dorothea Dix School of Nursing Related Papers (Call no.: ORG.140)
  • Economic Development Record Group. Science and Technology Development Section, Science and Technology Research Center: Photograph File. (MARS Id: 44.19 (Series))
  • Economic Development Record Group. Science and Technology Development Section, Science and Technology Research Center: Subject File. (MARS Id: 44.21 (Series))
  • General Assembly Record Group. Session Records (MARS Id: 66.8 (Series))
  • State Board of Education Record Group. Swamp Lands Records (MARS Id: 1.1 (Series))
  • Health Services Record Group. Health Services Laboratory Section: Hookworm Disease Survey and Correspondence (MARS Id: 93.14 (Series))
  • Health Services Record Group. Health Services Laboratory Section: Sanitary (Engineering) Surveys File (MARS Id: 13 (Series))
  • Raleigh and Quarry Experimental Railroad Minutes (Call no.: G.O.151)
  • Rural Electrification Authority Record Group. County Survey File (MARS Id: 50.7 (Series))
  • Rural Electrification Authority Record Group. Letters and Information — 1934 Survey (MARS Id: 50.12 (Series))
  • Rural Electrification Authority Record Group. Requests for Electric Service (MARS Id: 50.9 (Series))
Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, TUNL, at Duke University

(Call no. Econ. Devel. RG. Sci. and Tech. Devel. Section, Sci. and Tech. Research Cntr.: Photograph File)

To search for additional STEM resources at the State Archives of North Carolina, visit our MARS online catalog.

Promotional brochure from The Dorothea Dix School of Nursing

(Call no. ORG.140)

To learn more about Science, Technology, and Innovation in North Carolina, check out this list of articles that can be found at NCpedia.

To learn more about Scientists and Inventors in North Carolina, check out this list of biographies that can be found at NCpedia.

Posted by: Olivia | August 18, 2015

Summer of the Archives

Have you ever scrolled through the many items in the North Carolina Digital Collections and discovered a hidden treasure? Each week this summer we will highlight an item from our collection in the hopes of inspiring you to discover new-to-you materials in our digital collections.

Looking to try something new? How about dying your own fabric, whipping up some arthritis treatments, or white washing your own stucco? The State Archives of North Carolina Private Collections includes the Polk Recipe Book from 1858. The Polk Recipe Book is from the Lucy Williams Polk Papers private collection. Lucy Williams Polk was wife to Williams Polk, whose brother was James K. Polk, the 11th President of the United States. The recipe book belonged to Mary K. Williams, Lucy’s mother.

Polk Recipe Book, 1858, PC_75_10_Polk_Recipe_Book

Polk Recipe Book, 1858, PC_75_10_Polk_Recipe_Book

The recipe book includes handwritten recipes ranging from fabric dyes, herbal remedies, jellies, cakes, breads, and apparently even a ginger beer recipe (although I haven’t found that one yet!). The book also includes newspaper cutouts on topics ranging from “Training Steers” to “Bed-Bugs”. It’s everyone’s do-it-yourself home-keeping manual (or at least the 1850s version)!

The item is part of the NCDC artificial online collection, Food and Cooking, which began as part of the 2013 North Carolina Archives week celebration. Other items in the collection include cookbooks, court transcripts for moonshine cases, and trademark applications; all relating to North Carolina food culture and history. So go check out the recipe for not only green pickles, but also yellow pickles, from the Polk Recipe Book.

But keep in mind, this is from the 1800s, they might not have most things at the grocery store. Although the German Ginger Cake might be worth trying to modernize the recipe. If you want to read more about transforming historical recipes into modern ones, check out an article about it here.

P.S. the Ginger Beer recipe is on page 10!

Posted by: Ashley | August 17, 2015

Archivist Sleeps With Constitution

[This blog post was written by Sarah Downing, an archivist at the Western Regional Archives]

In front of the National Archives in Washington, D.C.

In front of the National Archives in Washington, D.C.

Remember when you were a kid and you had a friend over to spend the night? In sleeping bags on the floor, you could stay up late and watch TV, play games, tell ghost stories or share secrets with your sleepover pal.

Last month, Lead Archivist Heather N. South at the Western Regional Archives, in Asheville, participated in a sleepover of a different kind when she traveled to the nation’s capital to spend the night in the rotunda of the National Archives building on Constitution Avenue. South chaperoned Riley Flynn to the event for 8 – 12 year olds sponsored by the National Archives Foundation.

Constructed during the 1930s as part of the three-structure Federal Triangle, the National Archives building houses the documentary heritage of the United States. Three documents known collectively as The Charters of Freedom – the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights – are on display in the spacious rotunda.

“The program was designed for kids, but I think the adults had just as much fun,” said South. “I consider the Charters of Freedom the ultimate in historical documents, so I jumped at the chance to dream of the Declaration of Independence while sleeping next to it!” All she needed was a 10 old willing to share in her archival adventure. “Riley was the perfect choice and she only rolled her eyes at my giddy joy twice.”

During the sleepover kids had the opportunity to learn about various eras of U.S. history through visits from explorers from the past and by seeing some of the treasures housed in the National Archives. The overnight stay ended with a pancake breakfast with Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero lending a hand in the kitchen!

According to South, “From scavenger hunts to historical interpretation and music, the experience was a spectacular way to learn and explore the archives, documents and our nation’s history.” Riley thoroughly enjoyed it all but Heather’s favorite quote from her traveling companion sums everything up, “the archivist’s pancakes were delicious!”

Posted by: kevin | August 12, 2015

Summer of the Archives

Have you ever scrolled through the many items in the North Carolina Digital Collections and discovered a hidden treasure? Each week this summer we will highlight an item from our collection in the hopes of inspiring you to discover new-to-you materials in our digital collections.

World War I poster encouraging civilians to eat cottage cheese instead of meat. [MilColl.WWI.Posters.5.39.c2]

World War I poster encouraging civilians to eat cottage cheese instead of meat. [MilColl.WWI.Posters.5.39.c2]

Eat More Cottage Cheese.  With the gears of war shifting into motion, the United States promoted a home front campaign to conserve resources and focus the attention of its citizens onto the war.  Posters were created, many precursors to the more advanced propaganda machine of World War II.  This poster from the World War I Papers Military Collection encourages the civilian population to eat more cottage cheese in an attempt to conserve meat for the troops. For more information about the home front in North Carolina, check out this NCpedia article.

Posted by: Ashley | August 5, 2015

New Web Address for State Archives Website

The website of the State Archives of North Carolina has a new web address: archives.ncdcr.gov.

It will take a while for us to update links, support documents, and other resources to reflect the new web address, so please be patient with us during the transition.
The State Archives has a new web address: archives.ncdcr.gov

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