Posted by: Kat | June 30, 2015

Summer of the Archives Series

Have you ever scrolled through the many items in the North Carolina Digital Collections and discovered a hidden treasure? Each week this summer we will highlight an item from our collection in the hopes of inspiring you to discover new-to-you materials in our digital collections.

Air-conditioning unit over cotton yarn spinning frame. 1938

Air-conditioning unit over cotton yarn spinning frame. 1938

T.G.I.A.C! As summer rolls on and the temperature and humidity outside continue to rise, many of us are thankful for our air-conditioning units, and shiver to think about what life was like before beloved AC. The first humidity-controlling and air ventilation systems in the south were installed in cotton mills in order to maintain favorable conditions for spinning cotton yarn, and, as a bonus, provide a more comfortable environment for mill workers. Stuart W. Cramer, born in Thomasville, N.C., was an architect and engineer who coined the term “air-conditioning” in a paper read to the American Cotton Manufactures Association convention in 1906. By the 1930s, air-conditioning, which had previously been found only in industrial settings, was increasingly installed in movie theatres, railway cars, and, after the invention of the window unit in 1951, private homes. This photograph is part of the Historic North Carolina Travel and Tourism digital collection, comprised of photos from the North Carolina Conservation and Development Department, Travel and Tourism Division.

Posted by: kevin | June 29, 2015

Second Administration Alexander Martin Papers

George Washington’s proclamation regarding the Whiskey Rebellion (GP19, September 15, 1792).

As the digitization of North Carolina’s historical Governors’ papers continues, the second administration of Alexander Martin is now available via the North Carolina Digital Collections. Governor Martin served for two administrations, from 1782 to 1785 and 1790 through 1792. Among this second batch of papers include letters and proclamations written by contemporary powerhouses George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Alexander Hamilton. These three terms were less dictated by recovering from the Revolutionary War and more by the formation of a nation, charting a course between Federalist and Anti-Federalist ideals, and helping to ensure Raleigh became the state capital.

For more information about Alexander Martin, check out this finding aid and NCpedia article.

Below is an abridged list of individuals found in the new batch of correspondence. Click on a name for their NCpedia article:

William Blount, John Hamilton, Benjamin Hawkins, Samuel Johnston, Hugh Williamson

Posted by: Olivia | June 23, 2015

Summer of the Archives Series

Have you ever scrolled through the many items in the North Carolina Digital Collections and discovered a hidden treasure? Each week this summer we will highlight an item from our collection in the hopes of inspiring you to discover new-to-you materials in our digital collections.
PlanOfRaleigh1792On June 13, 2015 the North Carolina State Capitol celebrated its’ 175th anniversary. Did you know that the first State House was burned in 1831 and the present State Capitol was completed in its place in 1840, and Raleigh was specifically planned as a capital city? One of the items in the Raleigh History Collection in the North Carolina Digital Collections is the original plan map for the city of Raleigh. Raleigh is considered among one of the earliest planned cities in the United States. The map was created in 1792 by William Christmas a state senator of Franklin County. The map used a total of 400 acres creating Union Square as the center of the city, where the capital building would be located. After setting aside acreage for the future State House, four public parks and streets, 276 acres were remaining. They were drawn up into one-acre lots which were to be sold at public auction with the money to fund the building of the capital and other public buildings.

The Raleigh History Collection has a wide variety of materials relating to the development of Raleigh: photographs, legislation, artwork, and more maps created over the years for the planning of Raleigh. If you would like to learn more about the history of Raleigh, visit NCPedia or NC Historical Markers. To see more maps about North Carolina in general, visit NCMaps.

Posted by: kevin | June 16, 2015

Summer of the Archives Series

Have you ever scrolled through the many items in the North Carolina Digital Collections and discovered a hidden treasure? Each week this summer we will highlight an item from our collection in the hopes of inspiring you to discover new-to-you materials in our digital collections.

Chemical waChemical_Warfare_Agentsrfare was a pressing concern during the Second World War after its extensive use in the Great War. The U.S. Office of Civilian Defense provided a handy guide to identify various chemicals that could be used in such an attack on the home front. Though never needed, this guide provides insight into the fears and level of preparedness the United States experienced and promulgated.

More information about North Carolina’s contributions to World War II and the use of Civilian Defense can be found on NCpedia and more World War II posters and maps can be found in the North Carolina Digital Collections.

Posted by: Francesca | June 9, 2015

Summer of the Archives Series

Have you ever scrolled through the many items in the North Carolina Digital Collections and discovered a hidden treasure? Each week this summer we will highlight an item from our collection in the hopes of inspiring you to discover new-to-you materials in our digital collections.

PC_1618_EqualSuffrageAmendment19th_1920_ProSuffrageCerculars_Flags_001In our Women in North Carolina 20th Century History digital collection, there is an excellent image of a Pro-woman Suffrage Circular: “Women Vote under these Flags.” This circular showed that other countries allowed women to vote and it was only right for women to vote in the United States as well. This image is also appropriate for International Archives Day (June 9, 2015) because this year’s theme is democracy. You can find other blog and social media content related to International Archives Day under the Twitter hashtags: #IAD15 #democracy.

For more information on International Archives Day 2015 visit: https://askarchivists.wordpress.com/2015/05/15/lets-celebrate-democracy-and-rights-on-june-9th-2015/

Posted by: Ashley | June 9, 2015

State Archives Website Down

The website of the State Archives of North Carolina is currently inaccessible. The issue is being addressed and we hope that access will be restored in about an hour. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Although the website is currently unavailable, several of our other tools are unaffected, including:

We will update this post as we have more news to share on this issue.

 Update: the website is currently available at: http://www2.ncdcr.gov/archives/Home.aspx. Work is ongoing to fix redirects from other URLs (like our old web address archives.ncdcr.gov, for example).

Select correspondence of Samuel Johnston have been digitized and are now available as part of the historical Governors’ Papers at North Carolina Digital Collections.

Letter from Pres. George Washington to Gov. Samuel Johnston, October 2, 1789.

Letter from Pres. George Washington to Gov. Samuel Johnston, October 2, 1789. (Call No. G.P.17)

Johnston served as North Carolina’s sixth governor from December 1787 through December 1789. While governor, he presided over the North Carolina convention that ratified the United States Constitution in November 1789. Johnston also oversaw the arrest of John Sevier and the collapse of the separatist “State of Franklin,” as well as negotiations with Cherokee and Chickasaw Indians over land rights. Included in the collection are two letters signed by President George Washington. The finding aid to Samuel Johnston’s correspondence can be viewed here.

For more information on Samuel Johnston, check out these NCpedia articles:

http://ncpedia.org/biography/johnston-samuel

http://ncpedia.org/biography/governors/johnston-samuel

Information about many of Johnston’s North Carolinian correspondents can also be found at NCpedia:

Martin Armstrong: http://ncpedia.org/biography/armstrong-martin
J.B. Ashe: http://ncpedia.org/biography/ashe-john-baptist
Francis Child: http://ncpedia.org/biography/child-francis
Benjamin Hawkins: http://ncpedia.org/biography/hawkins-benjamin
Egbert Haywood: http://ncpedia.org/biography/haywood-egbert
James Hogg: http://ncpedia.org/biography/hogg-james
Joseph Martin: http://ncpedia.org/biography/martin-joseph
Charles McDowell: http://ncpedia.org/biography/mcdowell-charles
James Robertson: http://ncpedia.org/biography/robertson-james
John Sevier: http://ncpedia.org/biography/sevier-john
William Skinner: http://ncpedia.org/biography/skinner-william
Montfort Stokes: http://ncpedia.org/biography/governors/stokes
John Swann: http://ncpedia.org/biography/swan-or-swann-john
John Tipton: http://ncpedia.org/biography/tipton-john
James White: http://ncpedia.org/biography/white-james
Hugh Willamson: http://ncpedia.org/biography/williamson-hugh

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