Barbequeing pork over an open pit near Rocky Mount, NC, September 1944. From the Conservation and Development Department, Travel and Tourism Photo Files. Call number: ConDev4648.5C. Learn more on Flickr.

Smoking pork over an open pit near Rocky Mount, NC, September 1944. From the Conservation and Development Department, Travel and Tourism Photo Files. Call number: ConDev4648.5C. Learn more on Flickr.

The Friends of the Archives (FOA) Annual Corporation Meeting and Program will be held on Monday, June 1, 2015 at 1:30 p.m. in the State Archives/State Library Building Auditorium (109 E. Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina).

The speaker will be Dr. John Shelton Reed who will talk about “North Carolina and the Original American Barbecue.” For more information, see the event flyer. The Friends of the Archives is grateful for the support of The Pit restaurant and their donation of barbecue samples after the program.

The Friends of the Archives is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization formed in 1977 whose mission is to support, promote, and strengthen the collections, services, and programs of the State Archives of North Carolina.  The mission of the State Archives is to collect, preserve and provide access to North Carolina’s documentary history and culture.

Correspondence from the second administration of Richard Caswell is now available through the North Carolina Digital Collections. Caswell was North Carolina’s first and fifth governor, making him the first governor to serve for two administrations. From 1749 to his death in 1789, Caswell was continuously involved in military and political matters regarding North Carolina and he filled a multitude of positions including member of the colonial assembly, deputy attorney general, and commander of the state militia. He focused on creating a strong state militia and spent a large portion of his time raising and leading troops. Caswell spent his final three terms as Governor pacifying the unrest among the Cherokee, supporting the creation and ratification of a federal Constitution, and responding to various petitions from his constituents. Much of the correspondence online encompasses these topics and also includes Congressional acts and resolutions, treaties with the Cherokee, and a draft of a Constitution of the State of Franklin.

For more information about Richard Caswell, check out this finding aid and NCpedia article.

Below is an abridged list of individuals found in the new batch of correspondence. Click on a name for their NCpedia article:

Thomas Blount, John Gray Blount, Benjamin Hawkins, John Haywood, James Robertson, John Sevier, Evan ShelbyRichard Dobbs SpaightSamuel Spencer, Hugh Williamson

In our ongoing project to showcase the involvement of North Carolinians in World War I, we have been uploading lots of new items to our North Carolina Digital Collections. We have just released additional images and transcripts of correspondence from private collections donated to the State Archives and held in our Military Collection. This batch of letters includes correspondence from American soldiers, as well as American volunteers in Europe. The finding aid for the Military Collection, World War I Papers, Private Collections can be found here. Below are brief descriptions of the newly-featured soldiers and volunteers.

Early Volunteers

Sgt. Kiffin Y. Rockwell (Call no. MilColl.WWI.PC.32)

Sgt. Kiffin Y. Rockwell (Call no. MilColl.WWI.PC.32)

Within a week of the outbreak of the war in Europe in August 1914, Sgt. Kiffin Yates Rockwell and his brother, Paul, both of Asheville, (Buncombe County) North Carolina, departed for Europe to volunteer for service with the French army. They enlisted in the French Foreign Legion, but, within a year, both had been severely wounded. When Kiffin had recovered from the bullet wound to his leg, he became a charter member of the newly-formed Lafayette Escadrille, a volunteer organization of American fighter pilots in France. In May 1916, he became the first member of the unit to shoot down an enemy plane. He downed at least three others before being killed in aerial combat on September 23, 1916. In 1917 the Buncombe County Committee of Colonial Dames donated an ambulance in Kiffin’s honor to the American Field Service in Europe.

Letter: May Frances Jones to Mrs. Thomas Settle, November 8, 1918 (Call no. MilColl.WWI.PC.18)

Letter: May Frances Jones to Mrs. Thomas Settle, November 8, 1918 (Call no. MilColl.WWI.PC.18)

Elizabeth Earl Jones and May Frances Jones were sisters from Asheville, who volunteered in Europe during World War I. Elizabeth had been in England since 1916, before the United States joined the war, and stayed on throughout the conflict. She volunteered with the “American Ladies’ Red Cross Aid Committee” visiting wounded soldiers in hospitals and worked at the Y.M.C.A. “Eagle Hut” in London. May traveled to France in November 1918 and was a canteen worker and hut secretary for the Y.M.C.A. group embedded with the 318th Machine Gun Battalion, 81st Division, U.S. Army.

81st “Wildcat” Division

Pvt. John Burt Exum, Jr., of Fremont (Wayne County), N.C., served as a wagoner in Co. D, 306th Ammunition Train, 81st Division of the U.S. Army during World War I. For training, he was stationed at Camp Jackson, S.C., and was deployed to France in August 1918.

Pvt. Albert Leslie Lewis of Enfield (Halifax County), N.C., served in Co. C, 322nd Infantry, 81st Division. He was deployed to Europe in August 1918, but was injured in battle in France in September or October. The injury significantly affected his hearing and he spent several weeks recuperating in a hospital.

Cpl. Roy V. Martin (Call no. MilColl.WWI.PC.52)

Cpl. Roy V. Martin (Call no. MilColl.WWI.PC.52)

30th “Old Hickory” Division

Lt. Andrew H. Green of Raleigh (Wake County), N.C., served in Co. F, 120th Infantry, 30th Division of the Army National Guard during World War I. He was deployed to Europe in the spring of 1918, but was wounded in battle in Belgium in July. He spent many months recuperating in a hospital in England.

Cpl. Roy Vernon Martin of Gaston County, N.C., served in Co. A, 115th Machine Gun Battalion, 30th Division. He was deployed to Europe in the spring of 1918 and was stationed first in Belgium and then in France.

Army of Occupation in Germany

Pvt. Charles L. Dunn of Kinston (Lenoir County), N.C., served in Co. 77, 6th Machine Gun Battalion, 4th Marine Brigade, 2nd Division, during World War I. He was deployed to Europe in October 1917 where he was stationed first in France and then as part of the Army of Occupation in Germany. He was honorably discharged in July 1919.

Pvt. Harvey Lee Teague of Wallburg (Davidson County), N.C., served in Co. C, 56th Pioneer Infantry of the U.S. Army. He was deployed to Europe in August 1918 and was stationed first in France and then as part of the Army of Occupation. He returned to the U.S. in June 1919.

Letter: Harvey L. Teague to Sister, February 4, 1919 (Call no. MilColl.WWI.PC.55)

Letter: Harvey L. Teague to Sister, February 4, 1919 (Call no. MilColl.WWI.PC.55)

Cpl. Thomas Wayne Williams of Maxton (Robeson County) served in the Ordnance Department of the U.S. Army. His unit, the 303rd Advance Ordnance Depot, was stationed with the 3rd Division of the U.S. Army as part of the Army of Occupation in Germany.

On the Homefront

Pvt. Lonnie T. Graham of Jackson Springs (Moore County), N.C., attended the U.S. Army Training Detachment at Clemson College during the summer of 1918, and Officers’ Training School at Camp Gordon, Georgia, September-November 1918. He was never assigned to a unit or deployed overseas during World War I.

Pvt. Pierce Rose Pope of Godwin (Cumberland County), N.C., served in Battery F, 9th Field Artillery, and Battery D, 58th Field Artillery, during World War I. He was stationed at Camp Jackson, S.C.

Photograph of Dr. Chase Ambler, nature enthusiast, stands on a cliff in 1910.  From the Appalachian National Park Association, General Records, Western Regional Archives.

Dr. Chase Ambler, nature enthusiast, stands on a cliff in 1910; from the Appalachian National Park Association, General Records, Western Regional Archives. This item is among many that will be included in “Treasures of Carolina: Stories from the State Archives.”

The Friends of the Archives is pleased to announce an upcoming exhibit on the documents, history, and purpose of the State Archives of North Carolina. Treasures of Carolina: Stories from the State Archives will be open at the North Carolina Museum of History October 24, 2015 – June 19, 2016. Through a selection of documents from the Archives vault, unique letters, historical photographs, county and state agency records, posters, and digital media, the exhibit will illustrate the ways the State Archives documents state and county government, provides evidence of civil rights, and preserves the history and culture of North Carolina.

Sponsored by the Friends of the Archives, the exhibit will highlight rarely displayed archival materials, such as the 1663 Carolina Charter, North Carolina’s copy of the Bill of Rights, and a map dating from 1584, the oldest in the Archives’ collection. It will include fascinating glimpses into the lives of famous and not-so-famous North Carolinians through the documents they left behind, such as: a hand-drawn map from the Tom Dula murder trial; the 1665 will of Mary Fortsen, the oldest will known to exist in North Carolina; a rare 1903 African American publication created in response to changes in voter registration laws; the naturalization petition for Chang and Eng Bunker; and World War I photographs from North Carolina soldiers and sailors. The exhibit will also touch on current initiatives to capture and preserve online resources such as social media, GIS data, email, and government websites. In addition to materials from the collection in Raleigh, the exhibit will include items from the Archives’ regional repositories, the Outer Banks History Center (Manteo) and Western Regional Archives (Asheville).

While some materials will be available throughout the duration of the exhibit, some of the rarest items will only be on display for a short time. These materials include:

  • October 24 – October 27: North Carolina’s copy of the Bill of Rights;
  • October 28 – February 7: 11th Amendment and James Iredell’s diary;
  • February 8 – February 14: 1663 Carolina Charter;
  • February 15 – June 14: Signature documents including items signed by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, and Buckminster Fuller, among others.
  • June 15 – June 19: North Carolina’s copy of the Bill of Rights.

If you would like to support this event through a one-time donation, please visit the Friends exhibit web page for more information. Funding supplied by donors will be used for document conservation and framing, exhibit preparation, and informational materials.

About the Friends of the Archives

The Friends of the Archives is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization formed in 1977 whose mission is to support, promote, and strengthen the collections, services, and programs of the State Archives of North Carolina. The mission of the State Archives is to collect, preserve, and provide access to North Carolina’s documentary history and culture. Learn more at http://www.ncdcr.gov/archives/GetInvolved/Friends.aspx.

Select correspondence of Richard Dobbs Spaight have been digitized and are now available as part of the historical Governors’ Papers at North Carolina Digital Collections. Spaight served as North Carolina’s 8th governor from 1792-1795. Notably, he was the first native-born governor of North Carolina, and the first to convene the General Assembly in Raleigh.

Proclamation delivered by Richard Dobbs Spaight at New Bern, NC, May 25, 1793. Call no. GP Box 20, Richard Spaight.

Proclamation delivered by Richard Dobbs Spaight at New Bern, NC, May 25, 1793. Call no. GP Box 20, Richard Spaight.

His collected correspondence cover the period of his governance, which was punctuated by war in Europe between American allies France and England. Although President George Washington had declared the United States a neutral party to the conflict, strong support for France manifested in North Carolina’s seaport towns, particularly Wilmington, which caused considerable frustration for North Carolina’s government and militias. Spaight’s correspondence also reflect other issues of the time including: ongoing negotiations over repayment of Revolutionary War debts owed to the federal government by the state; continuing border disputes with South Carolina; efforts to quell Cherokee uprisings in the western regions of North Carolina; and state laws pertaining to stolen slaves. The finding aid to our Spaight collection can be found here.

Additional information about Richard Spaight can be found at NCpedia:
http://ncpedia.org/biography/governors/spaight
http://ncpedia.org/biography/spaight-richard-dobbs

Spaight famously died from injuries sustained in a dual with John Stanley. Some consider it “the most notorious affair of honor in North Carolina history.” Read about it here:
http://ncpedia.org/history/stanly-spaight-duel

Information about Spaight’s notable North Carolinian correspondents can be found in these NCpedia articles:

Henry Potter: http://ncpedia.org/biography/potter-henry
John Haywood: http://ncpedia.org/biography/haywood-john-0
Willaim Henry Hill: http://ncpedia.org/biography/hill-william-henry
Benjamin Smith: http://ncpedia.org/biography/governors/smith-benjamin
George Hooper: http://ncpedia.org/biography/hooper-george
Henry Toomer: http://ncpedia.org/biography/toomer-henry
John London: http://ncpedia.org/biography/london-john
Edward Jones: http://ncpedia.org/biography/jones-edward
William Richardson Davie: http://ncpedia.org/biography/governors/davie
Joseph Graham: http://ncpedia.org/biography/graham-joseph
Sam Ashe: http://ncpedia.org/biography/ashe-samuel
William Duffy: http://ncpedia.org/biography/duffy-william

As part of Preservation Week 2015, the State Archives is partnering with the State Library of North Carolina on a Preservation Week Question of the Day – a series of questions related to the preservation of materials both physical and electronic. See the State Library’s blog to see their question of the day posts.

What kind of computer can open the files on this 3.5” floppy disk from 1990?

Dysan floppy disk

  1. Any modern Windows or Mac computer, as long as you buy an external floppy drive.
  2. A Windows computer from around 1990 running MS-DOS and having a working floppy drive.
  3. A modern Windows computer with special hardware installed inside the computer, plus an external floppy drive, plus special software to emulate a 1990 computer.
  4. There is no computer that can read the disk, because the insides of the disk have definitely deteriorated too much by now.
  5. There’s no way to tell. You can’t be certain about whether the data has survived or what it will take to access the files until you start experimenting with different hardware and software.

Do you know the answer?  Find out below the cut.

Read More…

Posted by: Ashley | May 2, 2015

Making Digital Memories Persist

[This blog post was written by Kelly Eubank, head of the Digital Services Section.]

A whole generation has grown up with their lives recorded in digital form–photos, videos, class assignments, social interactions. For the digital files that are important to last, the creator must actively manage them. Digital files are vulnerable to loss from either human error (failure to be vigilant), natural disaster (hard drive failure or bitrot) or just plain neglect—unstable file formats, poor file naming, or failure to have multiple copies or move a file from a device before replacing that device.

People get new phones and new devices on average every two years. In order for digital files to persist, people can take some common, relatively painless actions. Firstly, because machines or devices may break, you should always keep multiple copies of files on different devices. If your phone has an option to back up your files to a cloud provider e.g. icloud or GoogleDrive, you should opt to do that. Additionally, we suggest you back up your device to a computer. As you run out of space on your device, you can transfer those to another machine that to delete them from your device. Second, not all file formats are equal. In the world of digital persistence, some file formats are more universally supported and can be read by different types of machines while others are closed and require a specific piece of hard ware and software to read them. For a list of recommended file formats, please consult our guidance document, “File Format Guidelines for Management and Long-Term Retention of Electronic Records.”

Last, when a machine or device saves a file, it typically either assigns it a name or will ask you to name it. If you don’t consciously name it something that will make sense to you now and in the future, you risk losing important files because you cannot remember the name of the file. This is particularly true with digital photos which inherit the name assigned to it by the SIM card. By renaming the file and organizing it according to function or event, you will better be able to discover it in the future. For more guidance on File Naming, please consult our guidance materials, “Best Practices for File Naming” or video tutorials on File Naming at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hi_A4Ywn4VU&feature=youtu.be.

For more tips and tricks, we invite you to take a look at our Digital Preservation Best Practices and Guidelines website at: http://www.digitalpreservation.ncdcr.gov/

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